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Center for
Social Innovation

Center for Social Innovation

Economic Development

Social Enterprise Enables Hazelnut Farming in Bhutan

Speaker(s): 
Daniel Spitzer, founder & CEO, Mountain Hazelnuts
Published: April 11, 2014
[photo - Daniel Spitzer]
Download  41 minutes,
More from this series: Responsibly Supply Chains Conference

Credits:

Steven Ng
Stefan Castelán

Turning Poison into Economic Opportunity

Speaker(s): 
Arup SenGupta, P.C. Rossin Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Lehigh University
Published: February 28, 2014
[photo - Arup SenGupta]
Download  28 minutes,
More from this series: The Tech Awards

Credits:

Steven Ng
Stefan Castelán

Towera Jalakasi: Breaking the Glass Ceiling in Africa

Speaker(s): 
Towera Jalakasi, Malawian entrepreneur
Ned Breslin, CEO, Water For People
Published: March 07, 2014
[photo - Towera Jalakasi]
Download  27 minutes,
More from this series: The Social Disruptors

Credits:

Paul Figgiani
Stefan Castelán

Tackling Energy Poverty With Pay-As-You-Go Solar

Speaker(s): 
Lesley Marincola, CEO, Angaza Design
Published: February 21, 2014
[photo - Lesley Marincola]
Download  20 minutes,
More from this series: The Tech Awards

Credits:

Paul Figgiani
Stefan Castelán

Using Science and Social Enterprise to Improve Rice Crop Yield in India and Bangladesh

Speaker(s): 
Pamela Ronald, Professor of Plant Patholoy and the Genome Center, University of California - Davis
Published: February 14, 2014
[photo - Pamela Ronald]
Download  28 minutes,
More from this series: The Tech Awards

Credits:

Steven Ng
Stefan Castelán

Hau Lee: Value Chain Innovation in Developing Economies

Speaker(s): 
Hau Lee, Thoma Professor of Operations, Information and Technology, Stanford Graduate School of Business
Published: February 04, 2014

Quality and Innovation as the Basis for Sustainability

Speaker(s): 
John Kehoe, VP of Sourcing and Development, TCHO
Published: January 31, 2014
[photo - John Kehoe]
Download  10 minutes,
More from this series: Responsible Supply Chains Conference

Credits:

Steven Ng
Stefan Castelán

Why Small Does Not Equal Powerless

Speaker(s): 
Katie Hill, MBA/MS '13, Stanford Graduate School of Business
Published: January 24, 2014
[photo - Katie Hill]
Download  07 minutes,
More from this series: Responsible Supply Chains Conference

Credits:

Paul Figgiani
Stefan Castelán

PATH and the Safe Water Project: Seeking Market-Based Solutions to Global Health

Academic Case Study by:
Stefanos Zenios, Lyn Denend, Tim Elliot
Published: 2013
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations. Over the course of the grant, PATH conducted approximately 10 pilots in four countries. In the process, the Safe Water Project team accumulated substantial insights related to user-centered design, access, and affordability (see OIT-107, OIT-108, and OIT-109 for specific lessons in each of these three areas). PATH also amassed a number of important general lessons about planning and executing pilot projects, which are expanded upon in the case.

GSB Faculty, Students and Staff only may view PDF document, authorization required.

Paper Copy: You may purchase this case from Harvard Business Publishing.

Case No: OIT106

PATH and the Safe Water Project: Making Safe Water Products More Affordable

Academic Case Study by:
Stefanos Zenios, Lyn Denend, Tim Elliott
Published: 2013
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations. 

One of the key objectives of this effort was to explore how the private sector could help make HWTS products more affordable. By conducting a portfolio of field-based pilots in collaboration with commercial partners, the PATH team sought to better understand the effect of different pricing, consumer financing, and subsidy models on demand within low-income population in developing countries. Over several years, the Safe Water Project team experimented with different affordability models, including microfinance loans for water filters and a layaway program. Although specific results varied across the pilots, which spanned India, Cambodia, and Kenya, they collectively gave rise to series of important insights about the affordability of HWTS products.

GSB Faculty, Students and Staff only may view PDF document, authorization required.

Paper Copy: You may purchase this case from Harvard Business Publishing.

Case No: OIT109

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