Education

Narrowing Educational Gaps Across America

Short Description: 

In an effort to narrow the gap in educational opportunities, Teach For America currently places over 5,000 teachers in low-income and poorly performing schools across the country. Its growing corps of alumni is also taking their educational experiences into careers in law, public health, policy making, and leadership. In this audio interview, Wendy Kopp, founder and chief executive officer of Teach For America, tells host Sheela Sethuraman about the history, goals, and ideals of that program.

Teach For America's goal is to encourage high-achieving college students to teach in low-income and underperforming schools across America. The organization has grown rapidly from its original class of 100 teachers to over 5,000 currently enrolled. In this audio interview, Wendy Kopp, founder and chief executive officer of Teach For America, tells host Sheela Sethuraman about the history, goals, and ideals of that program. She talks about the effect Teach For America has made on students' performance, and its relationship with the communities where it places teachers and the colleges from which it recruits. She also explains how the organization is funded. Finally, she discusses a  global organization called Teach For All, which seeks to replicate the methods and success of Teach For America in the developing world.

Wendy Kopp has spent the past 18 years developing the Teach For America corps into a prestigious, highly regarded program that attracts some of the nation's brightest young men and women. Kopp holds honorary doctorate degrees from Mount Holyoke College, Rhodes College, Pace University, Mercy College, Smith College, Princeton University, Connecticut College, and Drew University. She is the author of One Day, All Children: The Unlikely Triumph of Teach For America and What I Learned Along the Way, and is the youngest person and the first woman to receive Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson Award, the highest honor the school confers on its undergraduate alumni. In 2006, she was named one of America's Best Leaders by U.S. News and World Report.

Resources

In partnership with
Partner name: 
Sheela Sethuraman
Partner website url: 
http://www.eduweave.org/
Podcast #: 
3506
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
27
Size: 
12.5

Creating Hope for Afghan Women

Short Description: 

During turbulence and social upheaval most people retreat into themselves and focus on only one task--survival. Fortunately for the women and children of Afghanistan, Sakena Yacoobi did more. With only $20,000, Yacoobi formed what is now the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL). Until the fall of the Taliban in 2001, AIL operated underground. AIL now serves 350,000 women and children each year. Yacoobi explains her vision for AIL to Design for Change host Sheela Sethuraman as well as her incredible journey and experiences along the way.

While in power, the Taliban implemented the "strictest interpretation of Sharia law ever seen in the Muslim world," and became notorious internationally for their alleged treatment of women. Women were forced to wear the burqa in public and they were allowed neither to work nor to be educated after the age of eight, and until then were permitted only to study the Qur'an. Women seeking an education were forced to attend underground schools, where they and their teachers risked execution if caught.

Without equivocation, starting an enterprise to educate women during this time period would not seem like a likely scenario. However, sometimes out of the most extreme conditions, courageous leaders respond with innovation. As Sakena Yacoobi, founder of the Afghan Institute of Learning, explains in this interview with host Sheela Sethuraman, "When you see the need ... you just feel like you have to do something."

In this audio interview you'll hear Yacoobi describe how she founded the AIL, what were key management strategies that lead to its success, and her long term vision for AIL and Afghanistan. An inspiring story for social innovators everywhere, Yacoobi provides proof of how working from the heart with clear objectives can be a powerful source for social change.

Sakena Yacoobi is the founder of the Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL), one of the largest nonprofit organizations in Afghanistan. Founded in 1995, AIL provides education and health services for more than 350,000 Afghan women and children each year. Her organization works to find culturally appropriate ways to provide education for girls and women, and has trained more than 10,000 teachers.

Yacoobi is also involved in other international organizations for women and children's rights, including co-founding Creating Hope International, working with the International Rescue Committee, and serving as a board member of the Global Fund For Women.

In partnership with
Partner name: 
Sheela Sethuraman
Partner website url: 
http://www.eduweave.org/
Podcast #: 
3508
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
35
Size: 
16

Empower Children Through Financial Education

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Jeroo Billimoria is the founder of six successful enterprises. Her most recent effort is Aflatoun, a nonprofit organization that provides social and financial education to children. In this audio lecture, Billimoria shares the wisdom she's acquired over the years with Design for Change host Sheela Sethuraman. She talks about her successes with Aflatoun, including securing pro-bono support from various corporations, developing a scalable training model, and creating a global network of organizations.

Drawing inspiration from her mother's school social work, Jeroo Billimoria started early by setting up a help line for children in distress, risk or those that needed counseling. From just eight child volunteers answering a total of 848 calls in the first year, Child Helpline International has grown to handle more than two million calls a year, and serves over 153 countries.

In a similar vein, her most recent venture, Aflatoun, was born to fulfill the lack of basic financial literacy in rural children. In the initial years of Aflatoun, the major detriment to growth was the skepticism from the nonprofit sector over the importance of financial education. The naysayers believed that children did not need to know about money matters, and that her cause was a wasted one. Billimoria knew better. Leveraging her vast experience in pioneering social enterprises, she chose the most difficult countries and piloted her venture. After a staggering success in 11 nations, Aflatoun is set to cover more than one million children via a campaign run in over 75 countries by the year 2010.

Jeroo Billimoria is the founder of Child Savings International, now called Aflatoun, a global nonprofit organization that provides social and financial education to children, and of Childline India, a 24-hour emergency telephone service for India's street children, providing access to police assistance and health care. Trained as a social worker, she established several nonprofits in India to serve the needs of street children before starting Childline India in 1995. Since then Childline has responded to over 8 million calls for assistance.

In partnership with
Partner name: 
Sheela Sethuraman
Partner website url: 
http://www.eduweave.org/
Podcast #: 
3505
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
28
Size: 
13.2

Inspiring Youth through Global Communications

Short Description: 
TakingITGlobal is an online social network that enables socially conscious youth worldwide to learn about and take action on global issues. Kriss Deiglmeier, the Center for Social Innovation Center executive director, conducts an audio interview with Nick Yeo about how the endeavor leverages its online platform to partner with other organizations and inspire youth to make a difference.

Fifty percent of the world’s population is under the age of 25, and the majority of those youth live in the developing world. How do you harness the power and energy of that group for social action? In this audio interview , Kriss Deiglmeier, executive director of Stanford's Center for Social Innovation, converses with Nick Yeo, development and communications manager of a unique nonprofit called TakingITGlobal.

Yeo discusses how the organization utilizes a free, multilingual online platform that employs Web 2.0 community tools to support youth in creating change in their communities and globally. He shares TakingITGlobal’s strategies and approaches to effectively bridge online and off-line engagement, as well as learning and action. The project won the 2007 Microsoft Education Award, administered by the Tech Museum in San Jose, Calif.

Nick Yeo is a global nomad, classically trained pianist, former youth theater actor, electric bass doodler, and development and communications manager for TakingITGlobal. In this latter role, he is responsible for business development, including fundraising, grant writing, sponsorships, partnerships, and other revenue generating streams. He also heads up communications, handling media relations, publications, and management of the organization's design team and internal communications between all stakeholders. Born in Vancouver, Canada, Yeo has lived in Singapore, Taipei, Bangkok, Montreal, and now Toronto. He holds a joint honors degree in history and philosophy from McGill University.

Resources

In partnership with
Partner name: 
The Tech Museum
Partner website url: 
http://www.thetech.org/
Podcast #: 
3476
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
29
Size: 
13.5

International Development Through Youth

Short Description: 
The future of international development may lie in the hands of children. In this audio interview with Sheela Sethuraman, Jeroo Billimoria talks about how her organization, Aflatoun, provides social and financial education to youth ages 6 to 14 in 31 countries. She discusses Aflatoun's work with partners to create and disseminate innovative curricula to mainstream schools, and its vision for continuing to empower young people over the next five years.

Jeroo Billimoria believes that international development starts with fostering children’s social and financial awareness. In this audio interview with Stanford Center for Social Innovation correspondent Sheela Sethuraman, Billimoria talks about how her organization, Aflatoun, provides education on these matters to children ages 6 to 14. She discusses how her organization has grown to reach more than 540,000 young people in 31 countries. She talks about how the organization works with partners, ensures the quality of its curricula around the world, and works to move such curricula into mainstream schools. Billimoria also shares challenges, course corrections, and the organization’s vision for the next five years. Her work adds an important new component to international development work.

Jeroo Billimoria is founder and executive director of Aflatoun, an organization dedicated to social and financial education for primary school children across the world. The organization focuses on two key areas: children’s rights and the encouragement of savings and other positive financial habits among young people. Billimoria is a serial social entrepreneur who has founded six organizations. In 2003, she moved to Amsterdam to found Child Helpline International, and it was through this and her work at MELJOL in India that she began to experiment with the Aflatoun concept.

Resources

In partnership with
Partner name: 
Sheela Sethuraman
Partner website url: 
http://www.eduweave.org/
Podcast #: 
4315
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
29
Size: 
13.3

Financing California Schools

Short Description: 

How is California, home of the technology revolution, preparing the next generation of students to lead the charge of innovation? In this University podcast, Senator Joe Simitian and Professor Michael Kirst argue that school financing in California is neither adequate, efficient, nor equitable. Speaking at the Stanford School of Education, they discuss the challenges of financing California's K-12 schools in a rapidly changing environment with diffuse accountability and dilute authority.

Senator Joe Simitian and Stanford Education Professor Emeritus Michael Kirst discuss the challenges of school financing in California in a context of vast bureaucracy, diffuse accountability, and diluted authority. Simitian discusses whether California schools will be adequately funded in the near future, points to inequities in funding across districts, and critiques the lack of adequate performance measurement tools. Kirst shares the sobering results of his studies on the California school system, and makes recommendations for education reform in a fiscal environment that is not likely to improve soon.

Assembly member Joe Simitian was elected to the California State Assembly in November 2000, and was re-elected in November 2002 to represent the 21st Assembly District in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties. Over the years, he has also served in various public service roles, including mayor of Palo Alto, representative of the President of the United States in El Salvador, and elections supervisor in Bosnia. Simitian is a public schools attorney, businessman, and city planner. He holds a master's in international policy studies from Stanford University, and a master's of city planning from the University of California, Berkeley.

Podcast #: 
3205
Podcast info
Length(in hours): 
1
Size: 
27.9

The Future of Jazz

Short Description: 

As executive producer of MCG Jazz, Marty Ashby works with musicians who often devote their proceeds to a community arts and vocational training center in Pittsburg, Penn. In this audio interview, Ashby charts for Globeshakers host Tim Zak his career from jazz musician to director of this philanthropic jazz performance and recording venue.

Marty Ashby knows jazz inside and out. His organization is at the epicenter of the jazz world and is leading the industry forward. As Executive Producer of MCG Jazz, Marty has produced over 1,200 concerts in various cities and has created ten commercial albums, receiving three GRAMMY Awards from four nominations. Artists such as Nancy Wilson, Paquito D'Rivera, and The Count Basie Orchestra have all performed for and contributed to the success of the MCG Jazz label. The artists often devote their proceeds to MCG Jazz's parent organization, the Manchester Craftsmen's Guild (MCG), a community arts and vocational training center in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.

In this audio interview with Tim Zak, Marty charts his career from jazz musician in New York City, to director of orchestras in Cleveland and Pittsburgh, and finally to his current role as director of one of the country's top jazz performance and recording venues. For Marty, the spirit of collaboration and improvisation that characterizes America's unique music form, jazz, also infuses the culture of the Manchester Craftsmen's Guild itself.
Since 1987, Marty Ashby has been the Artistic Director of the Animal Crackers Jazz Series in Racine, Wisconsin, and for the last five years, was the Artistic Director of the Jazz on the Circle Series at Severance Hall in Cleveland, Ohio. Marty also produced the Jazz at Seven Springs Jazz Festival between 1988 and 2000. In the early 1980s, he produced the Ithaca Jazz Festival and the Boys Choir of Harlem Street Fair. Before coming to MCG, he worked in marketing and development departments of several major symphony orchestras including the Cleveland Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic, and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

In partnership with
Partner name: 
CMU
Partner website url: 
http://www.cmu.edu/index.shtml
Podcast #: 
2977
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
35
Size: 
16.4

Social Entrepreneurs in For-Profit Education

Short Description: 

Can business add value to the education field? Pioneers and market leaders who have built successful businesses around the many unmet needs in education talk about the business opportunities in education today in this panel discussion from Bridging the Gap, the Stanford 2005 Net Impact conference organized by the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Can business add value to the education field? This panel discussion from Bridging the Gap, the Stanford 2005 Net Impact conference organized by the Stanford Graduate School of Business, features entrepreneurs who leverage for-profit business models to offer high-caliber education. These pioneer and market leaders, who have built successful businesses around the many unmet needs in education, talk about the business opportunities in education today. Panelists emphasize the need to set up teachers to be social entrepreneurs.

Michael Dougherty has been chairman and CEO of Kindermusik International since December 1996. Before KI, he was the president of Gymboree Play Programs, Inc., executive vice president and COO of Leisure Sports, Inc., and management consultant and team leader for Bain & Company in San Francisco. Dougherty received his MBA degree in 1988 from Stanford University with a concentration in marketing and finance, and his AB degree in 1982 from Colgate University with a concentration in history and economics.

Dennis Doyle is cofounder and chief academic officer of SchoolNet. His career began as a consultant to the California legislature after earning his AB and MA in political science from the University of California at Berkeley. He later joined the federal government as an assistant director of the U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity where he developed major education reform projects. He was transferred to the U.S. Office of Education, where he served as an assistant director of the National Institute of Education. Since that time, Doyle has served in four think tanks. He is the coauthor of Investing in Our Children, and other books.

Podcast #: 
2918
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
24
Size: 
11.1

Innovation in Public Education

Short Description: 

In this panel discussion, entrepreneurs in the field of education talk about how to work with the market and apply business practices and frameworks to the problem of urban education reform. Their lessons have relevance in areas ranging from teaching to administration, and from recruitment to organizational design.

In this panel discussion from the Stanford 2005 Net Impact Conference, organized by Stanford Graduate School of Business, Hunter Pierson, executive director of Teach for America, introduces a panel of entrepreneurs in education who work with the market to lead their organizations to success. Panelists explore the challenges and opportunities of applying business practices and strategies to urban education reform, discussing how business people are helping enhance education for students in need. They consider innovation in areas such as teaching, administration, recruitment, and organizational design. The discussion is particularly timely in light of the No Child Left Behind legislation.

Marlon Evans is the director of operations for the KIPP Foundation, a network of free, open-enrollment, college-preparatory public schools in under-resourced communities throughout the United States. She graduated from Stanford University with a B.A. in science.

Lynn Liao is director of Broad Residency in Urban Education, a two-year, management-training program for talented emerging executives seeking to lead urban school districts. Previously, she was a director at the Broad Foundation, responsible for the foundation’s portfolio of investments in district and national principal leadership programs. Liao formerly managed an online math-tutoring program for SCORE! Learning Corporation’s Internet division, and was a consultant with McKinsey & Company. She received her BA from the University of California, Berkeley, and MBA and MA in education from Stanford University.

Podcast #: 
2914
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
55
Size: 
25.2

The Next Generation of Digital Craftsman

Short Description: 

As "chief architect" of PixelCorps, Alex Lindsay created a guild for the next generation of craftsmen: digital craftsmen. In this audio interview, Lindsay describes to Globeshakers host Tim Zak how PixelCorps is currently transferring skills in digital imaging and animation to regions in the developing world so that their workforces can capitalize on the coming media revolution.

As "chief architect" of PixelCorps, Alex Lindsay merges the very old idea of a guild system made up of independent craftsman with the demands of mastering new and emerging media. PixelCorps serves as a guild for the next generation of craftsmen -- digital craftsmen. In this audio interview, Lindsay describes to Globeshakers host Tim Zak how PixelCorps is currently transferring skills in digital imaging and animation to regions in the developing world so that their workforces can capitalize on the coming media revolution. He discusses challenges involved in the areas of training, standardization, access to resources, and production experience.

Alex Lindsay has been involved in computer graphics for nearly 20 years. He has extensive experience in digital production including print, real-time graphics, multimedia titles, forensic animation, television, and film. He spent several years on the production of Star Wars: Episode 1 (at JAK Films and then at Industrial Light and Magic). Lindsey taught at the Academy of Art and at the San Francisco State Multimedia Studies Programs. He writes for 3D Magazine, 3D World, and Post, and is a regular guest on TechTV.

Resources

In partnership with
Partner name: 
CMU
Partner website url: 
http://www.cmu.edu/index.shtml
Podcast #: 
2883
Podcast info
Length(in minutes): 
29
Size: 
13.5
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