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Center for
Social Innovation

Center for Social Innovation

Nonprofit Management

Founders' Values Help Shape Gender Mix in High-Tech

Research by:
Michael Hannan, James Baron, Greta Hsu, Ozgecan Kocak
Published: 2007
[photo - Michael Hannan]
[photo - James Baron]
[photo - Greta Hsu]
[photo - Ozgecan Kocak]
Citation:

In the Company of Women
Work & Occupations; Vol 34, Ed. 1, pp. 35-66

The Gendered Implications of Apparently Gender-Neutral Organizational Theory: Re-Reading Weber

Research by:
Joanne Martin , K. Knopoff
Published: 2009
[photo - Joanne Martin]
Citation:

Ruffin Lecture Series (Volume III): Business Ethics and Women’s Studies
A. Larson & R. Freeman (Eds.), Women's studies and business ethics. New York: Oxford University Press.

Self-Enhancement Biases and Negotiator Judgment: Effects of Self-Esteem and Mood

Research by:
Roderick M. Kramer, Elizabeth Newton, Pamela Pommerenke
Published: 1991
[photo - Roderick M. Kramer]
Citation:

Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, October 1993, Vol. 56 Issue 1, pp. 110-133

Stanford Graduate School of Business Working Paper #1178

An interview with Peter Hero (MBA '66)

Peter Hero (MBA '66)

Published: May 19, 2009

Affiliation:
Donor, GSB Alum, Social Innovation Conversations Podcast Listener, Stanford Social Innovation Review Reader
What are your causes?

I care most about developing a sense of community around philanthropy, particularly among younger people with self-made wealth in Silicon Valley. These kinds of donors tend to have a greater sense of idealism and interest in making a social investment, but often are not sure where to give and how to reliably measure the impact of their involvement.

How do you contribute?

I was president and CEO of Community Foundation Silicon Valley for 18 years. I helped philanthropists to connect with one another and to use philanthropy in a way that makes a social impact. By 2008, we were giving away $150 million a year to virtually every sector of the nonprofit arena. Now I’m a senior fellow at the Center for Social Innovation and am helping promote social entrepreneurship among students through classes, advising, publishing, working with nonprofit leaders, and speaking on the work of the Center at conferences.

What are important lessons you learned?

In promoting philanthropy, I’ve found that the interests of people with self-made wealth are entirely different from those who come from traditionally wealthy families. That means there are many people out there who are now poised to make a difference in society.

Nonprofits are managed as well as, or better than, most businesses. I’m a raving fan of the work these organizations do with limited resources.

There is an unmet opportunity for government and philanthropy to become more creatively engaged. There needs to be better communication between the two. The really big problems are only going to be solved by really big dollars and really big system change. I’m hopeful about that.

An interview with Katherine Boas

Katherine Boas

Published: May 20, 2009

Affiliation:
Donor, GSB Alum, Stanford Social Innovation Review Reader
What are your causes?

Microlending is in vogue these days, and though financial capital seems abundant, intellectual capital doesn’t flow as freely. Teaching the world’s poorest entrepreneurs the basic business skills they need to make better decisions with their loans makes us all better.

I’m also interested in access to education and information closer to home.

How do you contribute?

With the GSB’s support, a classmate and I created a tool, the Barefoot MBA, to give the world’s smallest business owners knowledge and concepts to empower them to make better business decisions and provide better lives for themselves, their families, and their communities. The lessons are taught through storytelling and don’t rely on reading or props, so they can be easily understood by anyone, anywhere--from adult literacy classes in the city next door to rural community centers in the developing world. It is a free, open-source tool, supported by us, available to all at www.barefootmba.org.

What are important lessons you learned?

Education means more than classrooms and textbooks, which are taken for granted in our lives but can be barriers to learning in others’. What makes someone want to learn is showing how what’s being taught will be immediately relevant to improving whatever that person values. Figuring out those values takes work, but hearing thanks and requests for more is the greatest appreciation I’ve ever received.

An interview with Jessica Jackley (MBA '07)

Jessica Jackley (MBA '07)

Published: May 19, 2009

Affiliation:
Center Event Attendee, GSB Alum, Stanford Social Innovation Review Reader
What are your causes?

I care about connecting people across different cultures to alleviate poverty and improve economies. I cofounded Kiva, the first peer-to-peer microlending platform, which allows individuals to go to our website and lend an entrepreneur in a developing region as little as $25.

How do you contribute?

With these small microloans, we’re helping people like subsistence farmers, seamstresses, shop owners, traders in household goods, and all sorts of people to grow their businesses and support their families. We support projects in about 50 countries, and we have more than $1 million in loans going to fund enterprises in the developing world every week.

What are important lessons you learned?

If you have an idea, get out there and try it. 

 

It’s important to know what you want your organization to focus on, and not try to do too many things.

An interview with Jake Harriman (MBA '08)

Jake Harriman (MBA '08)

Published: May 19, 2009

Affiliation:
GSB Alum, Stanford Social Innovation Review Reader
What are your causes?

I’m passionate about ending extreme poverty. It’s an unnecessary evil in the world today. As a special operations platoon commander in the Marine Corps, I saw the ties between terrorism and extreme poverty, so I went to Stanford to develop a model that would allow us to create innovative, scalable, and sustainable solutions to address this problem. In our model, we work to create partnerships with organizations that are doing good work already.

How do you contribute?

I started Nuru International while I was at Stanford. We partner with rural communities empowering them to lift themselves out of extreme poverty permanently within five years. We design innovative, sustainable solutions to meet the specific needs in the community in the areas of water and sanitation, health care, education, agriculture, and small business. We also do campaigns to raise awareness about extreme poverty in communities and on college campuses, and we have a volunteer partnership program that allows people to work side by side with local people on specific poverty alleviation projects.

What are important lessons you learned?

The poor can teach us more than we can teach them.  People with very little can be incredibly intelligent and resourceful.

There is tremendous power behind a small group of individuals who set their minds to addressing seemingly insurmountable problems. You can make a significant impact in a very short time on the ground.

True strength and success come from being humble.

What are your favorite social innovation resources?

New York University Development Research Institute (DRI)
Social Edge

Any last thought you would like to share?

People think extreme poverty is an impossible problem that’s never going to end. There’s a lot of good work out there showing that if we all work together, we can solve this problem in our lifetime.

An interview with Eric Weaver (MBA '92)

Eric Weaver (MBA '92)

Published: May 19, 2009

Affiliation:
GSB Alum, Stanford Social Innovation Review Reader
What are your causes?

I’m interested in advancing the economic well-being of working people. I want everyone in the Bay Area to have economic self-sufficiency. Our country has a robust apparatus for subsidizing wealth accumulation through the income tax code, but earners at the bottom 20 percent see none of the benefits of that.

How do you contribute?

Opportunity Fund, which I founded, and where I serve as CEO, is a not-for-profit financial institution offering financial products and services to working people to help them build assets. We provide a financial education course combined with matched savings for working people. We match their savings with philanthropic and governmental sources of funding that help give them the same kind of incentives to save that upper-income earners have. We’re the largest provider of that kind of account in the country.

We also provide microfinance loans to small businesses in the San Francisco Bay Area, and we play a role in financing affordable housing in the Bay Area.

What are important lessons you learned?

Working people are good customers. When they’re provided with appropriate financial products, they perform very well.

As a social entrepreneur, I’ve learned that the single most important aspect of building a business is to attract the most talented people. And when management supports them and makes them believe in themselves, they can do remarkable things.

Any last thought you would like to share?

There’s a tendency in Silicon Valley to forget about our own backyard. It’s important to realize that our quality of life is dependent on people investing time and resources in this community, too.

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