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New Stanford research says those with big health problems may be getting less for their money than they could — and raising prices for all.

Resource: News Article

Short psychological interventions can change preconceptions, altering how people interact with their world. Effects are potent, cumulative and long lasting. Recent Stanford research reveals the benefits of brief interventions in both aggressive teens and antagonistic spouses.

Resource: News Article

Reducing carbon dioxide emissions may not be enough to curb global warming, say Stanford University scientists. The solution could require carbon-negative technologies that actually remove large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere.

Resource: News Article

Stanford experts are among the members of a commission issuing a new report on how to remove inequality in schools.

Resource: News Article

A study shows how the effects of "stereotype threat" can be overcome by assignments that foster a more supportive environment.

Resource: News Article

New Stanford research says those with big health problems may be getting less for their money than they could — and raising prices for all.

Resource: News Article

Short psychological interventions can change preconceptions, altering how people interact with their world. Effects are potent, cumulative and long lasting. Recent Stanford research reveals the benefits of brief interventions in both aggressive teens and antagonistic spouses.

Resource: News Article

Reducing carbon dioxide emissions may not be enough to curb global warming, say Stanford University scientists. The solution could require carbon-negative technologies that actually remove large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere.

Resource: News Article

Stanford experts are among the members of a commission issuing a new report on how to remove inequality in schools.

Resource: News Article

A study shows how the effects of "stereotype threat" can be overcome by assignments that foster a more supportive environment.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

Why local ownership and commitment are the exception and not the norm in most development efforts—and what development professionals can do about this problem.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

Lobbying and bribery are both time-honored ways to seek influence. The most important difference between them…is not that one is legal and the other a crime. It’s that bribery doesn’t last as long.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

Integrated reporting—the combination of a company’s financial and non-financial performance in one document—is a crucial step to creating a more sustainable society. It is being practiced around the globe by companies as varied as Philips, Novo Nordisk, PepsiCo, and Southwest Airlines.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

MORE THAN GOOD INTENTIONS: How a New Economics Is Helping to Solve Global Poverty by Dean Karlan & Jacob Appel

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

There are hundreds of life saving innovations that have the potential to help women and children in developing countries. Maternova is getting them to the front lines using a new online platform.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

The Peter C. Alderman Foundation uses rigorous analysis to outlast hundreds of failed nonprofits that were launched in response to 9/11.

Resource: Blog Post

As charitable causes are brought to the fore front by the release of movies like “Slumdog Millionaire,” and celebrity actions like the prospect of adopting a new white house dog, questions of how intent should impact charitable decisions arise. 

Resource: Blog Post

Nonprofits need to be spending more money on those they serve despite hard economic times. 

Resource: Blog Post

Remixes are becoming an ever growing part of contemporary culture consequently posing an interesting dilemma for cases of copy-right infringement. Where should we draw the line?

Resource: Blog Post

Nonprofits need to act now to improve all aspects of their operations or they will not survive the economic crisis that we are in. 

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Photo: Doug McAdam]

How are engaged citizens made? In this audio lecture, sponsored by the Stanford Social Innovation Review, Stanford sociology professor Doug McAdam argues that youth volunteering does not directly result in active citizens or a robust civil society. Instead, the responses to youth activism are varied and driven by historical and cultural context.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Photo: Aronson and Stachel]
What good is new energy technology if it can't be transported to the regions where it is most needed? In this audio interview, Sheela Sethuraman talks with Laura Stachel and Hal Aronson, co-founders of WE CARE Solar, about the international journey that led them to create one of the world's most portable solar energy systems. As The Tech Awards 2011 laureates of the Nokia Health Award, these two innovators work to bring reliable power to health care facilities all over the world.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Daniel Smith]
How can a young nonprofit organization make a tangible improvement in people's health through clean water using only the power of gravity? This was the challenge for Daniel Smith and the AguaClara team when they began work to introduce community-level drinking water treatment plants in Honduras. In this audio interview, Sheela Sethuraman learns from the 2011 Intel Environment Award winners about the importance of using local resources and experts to encourage horizontal learning.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Dean Jansen]

How can nonprofit and crowdsourcing experts collaborate to make media more accessible? In this audio interview, Sheela Sethuraman talks to Dean Jansen, co-Founder of Universal Subtitles, a volunteer platform for doing collaborative subtitling and translation of videos. As the winner of The Tech Awards 2011 Katherine M. Swanson Equality Award, Jansen discussed Universal Subtitles' current challenges and future potential in leveraging internet volunteerism.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Melissa Bradley]

Melissa Bradley, CEO of Tides, explores how partnerships between for-profit and nonprofit organizations--and everything in between--can increase scale and impact. In this audio lecture, recorded at the Stanford Social Innovation Review's 2011 Nonprofit Management Institute, Bradley discusses the current landscape of the social sector, and what scale and impact really mean. She also shares case studies of successful partnerships and the "top ten" lessons we can draw from collaborations.

Resource: Audio
[Video-Leading an Industry Turnaround: Lessons from Government Interventions at GM and Chrysler]

How did an Obama administration task force turn around the auto industry?

Resource: Video
[Video-Dr. Marcia McNutt: Conradin von Gugelberg Memorial Lecture Series]

How a team of scientists collaborated with the government to measure damage after the catastrophic Gulf oil spill in 2010.

Resource: Video
[Video-Public Management Program Oral History Panel]

In response to the historical events of the late 60's and the growing societal demands on business, the Stanford Graduate School of Business developed a pioneering vision for educating leaders who understand the world they live in and know to work across silos to accomodate the needs of both business and society. The founders of the Public Management Program share their motivations for creating the first program of the sort at a business school and why it is more relevant than ever today.

Resource: Video
[photo - Abhijit Upadhye]

McDonald's has migrated to India, and with it, a commitment to corporate social responsibility. In this university podcast, executive Abhijit Upadhye discusses how the introduction of the "golden arches" into the subcontinent over the past six years has resulted in the creation of local opportunities in the areas of agriculture and food production, storage, and transportation.

Resource: Audio
[Video-Know Your Sector]

Nonprofits in the U.S. generate $1.1 trillion every year, which is more than the entire economies of Saudi Arabia and Sweden combined. "Know Your Sector", a video created  by alum Ben Klasky (MBA '98), is intended as a resource for nonprofit employees, volunteers, and donors to better know the impact of their sector.

Resource: Video
[photo - Todd Rogers]

Applying psychology to the realm of politics shows that giving voters a few strategic nudges can push far more people in the direction of polls on election day. In this university podcast, Todd Rogers, Harvard professor and founder of the political research organization Analyst Institute, shares research that shows how "get out the vote" calls can be far more effective in changing behavior when just a few subtle techniques are used. Rogers spoke at the Stanford Prosocial Briefing.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Leslie John]

Can monetary incentives get people to lose weight? Yes, at least in the short term, says Harvard business professor Leslie John in this university podcast. John reports on studies using lotteries and the threat of financial loss in getting people to slim their waistlines, an important step in improving health. She spoke at the Stanford Prosocial Briefing.

Resource: Audio
[Video-James Sweeney: A Sustainable Energy System]

James Sweeney, director of Stanford's Precourt Energy Efficiency Center, discusses green cities at a Stanford GSB conference.

Resource: Video
[photo - Photo: Kate White]

Messaging that makes meanings easier to understand leads people to recycle more. That's the conclusion of a study reported on by Canadian Scholar Kate White in this University podcast. White says that negative messages about the dangers of not recycling work best when paired with concrete action steps, showing how to recycle. White spoke at the Stanford Prosocial Briefing.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Photo: Greg Walton]
When minority students are given subtle attitude-changing strategies to encourage a sense of belonging, their GPA goes up, the achievement gap goes down, and they report better health and well-being. That was the conclusion of a study co-led by Greg Walton and discussed in this university podcast. The results suggest that social belonging is a psychological lever where targeted intervention can have broad consequences that lessen inequalities in achievement and health. Walton spoke at the Stanford Prosocial Briefing.
Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases

Commissioned by KaBOOM! and authored by Katherine Fulton and alumna Heather McLeod Grant of the Monitor Institute, this case study looks at the challenges KaBOOM! faced and lessons the organization learned while pioneering an online strategy to scale its impact. This strategy involves giving away the nonprofit model online for free to empower others to act on KaBoom's behalf.

Resource: Practitioner Case

This case details the innovative work of business executive Tom Siebel, who launched the Meth Project in 2005 to 'unsell' meth to first time users in Montana. The program used an innovative research-based marketing campaign and has since scaled to other states. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - George Foster]

The Canary Fund supports the development of methods for early cancer detection. This second case presents the results of the sponsorship created to raise funding and awareness.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The Kinetics and Michael J. Fox Foundations both support research on Parkinson’s disease. This second case explores how these two organizations collaborate toward a common mission.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William P. Barnett]

The Wild Salmon Center was created to provide anglers access to excellent fishing in return for funding research and conservation. The case discusses the Center’s efforts to protect the pristine watersheds of the Kamchatka Peninsula by developing ecotourism to raise funds for conservation.

Resource: Academic Case

The CEO of Gardenburger, a seller of veggie burger products and other food alternatives to meat, considers the company’s advertising strategy. He aims to take the company from the small health-food niche to the consumer mainstream.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - John McMillan]

Luis Moreno Ocampo, an attorney who had fought human rights abuses in Argentina, views corruption in public procurement as the next major human rights issue. He established a company to collect and distribute information on public procurements to make the entire process more transparent.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William P. Barnett]

Various economic and environmental issues face the owners of a cruise business in the Galapagos Islands. The case gives special attention to the efforts of locals to preserve and enhance their own ecotourism business prospects.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Margaret L. Eaton]

VaxGen is working to obtain approvals for phase III clinical trials in Thailand for an experimental vaccine against HIV. The company must cope with a host of ethical questions.

Resource: Academic Case

John Goldman established the South Peninsula Jewish Community Teen Foundation in 2003, an innovative program that teaches Bay Area Jewish teens to run their own charitable foundation by developing mission statements, raising money, and distributing funds. As of 2009, the program has scaled to four chapters and raised and distributed $178,321 in funds. 

Resource: Academic Case

The Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs is Chinese environmental non-profit that has single-handedly revolutionized brought pollution standards and compliance to more than 47,000 sites and 22 multinational corporations in China. This case tells the story of the organization and its founder, environmental entrepreneur Ma Jun. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Design that Matters]

Incubators can prevent infant deaths from hypothermia, shorten hospital stays, and reduce the rate of neonatal complications that can lead to lifelong illness and disability. Unfortunately, they are far too expensive for many resource-constrained settings, particularly developing countries. Design that Matters (DtM) partnered with CIMIT to develop a concept incubator that was uniquely suited to the context of a developing country, made with parts already abundant in the environment. The results was NeoNurture. Although NeoNurture was never brought to the market, the process of developing this product introduced important insights about designing contextually appropriate projects. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - IDRI]

The Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI) was founded by immunologist Steve Reed in 1993 as a nonprofit global health research center. The institute was distinguished by its emphasis on the practical end goal of getting its products to market. To accomplish this, IDRI drew on distinct competencies of diverse collaboration. IDRI needed a substantial, ongoing stream of funding in order to continue realizing results. However, as a nonprofit, they could not tap into venture capital funding like private firms. These funding constraints made sustaining the company challenging and limited its strategic growth. This case study describes how Reed devised a model to create a for-profit development arms to commercialize select IDRI vaccine.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - KickStart]

Fisher and Moon founded KickStart to design tools that would enable Africa’s poor to launch and sustain their own profitable businesses. The organization’s first product was a line of manually operated irrigation pumps — branded “MoneyMaker Pumps” — that would help subsistence farmers transform their farms into profitable family businesses. The KickStart team believed that to be sustainable, its products had to be affordable and enable farmers to realize return on their investment within a relatively short period. This mini-case study explores this approach and how KickStart structures its business to provide enduring solutions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - KickStart]

KickStart was founded to design tools that would enable Africa’s poor to launch and sustain profitable businesses. Its first product was a line of manually operated irrigation pumps — branded “MoneyMaker Pumps” — that would help subsistence farmers transform their farms into profitable family businesses. When the first MoneyMaker pumps were brought to market, they were accepted by rural African farmers as affordable, versatile, durable, easy to maintain, and culturally appropriate. However,  KickStart subsequently faced significant challenges manufacturing MoneyMaker pumps in sufficient volumes and at a reasonable cost. This mini-case study examines how KickStart addressed these challenges to established high quality, affordable manufacturing for the long term.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - KickStart]

KickStart was founded by Martin Fisher and Nick Moon to design tools that would enable Africa’s poor to launch and sustain profitable businesses. Its first product was a line of manually operated irrigation pumps—branded “MoneyMaker Pumps”—that would help subsistence farmers transform their farms into profitable family businesses. When KickStart was ready to launch its MoneyMaker pumps, it faced the challenge of how to effectively reach and market the products to target consumers in Kenya, Tanzania, and Mali. In these regions, average farmers and their families are physically isolated and have few resources; because of this, it is likely purchasing a KickStart product may be the most expensive purchase they will ever make. Moreover, many farmers understand little about pump technology and cultural norms prevent the use of word-of-mouth sales and 'viral marketing' to promote the product. 

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Photo: Doctors]

Pauline Vaillancourt Rosenau and Christiaan Lako analyze the 2006 Dutch health insurance reform effort inspired by the work of Professor Alain Enthoven and based on regulated competition. The researchers draw lessons for the United States from the first two years of the plan's application in the Netherlands.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Photo: Professor Alan M Garber]

The U.S. health system has been described as the most competitive, heterogeneous, inefficient, fragmented, and advanced system of care in the world. Professor Alan Garber considers how that system compares to those of other wealthy countries, and concludes that it is indeed less efficient and productive, and in need of cost-controlling reforms.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Photo: Stethoscope]

America needs a far more efficient health care financing and delivery system. According to Professor Alain Enthoven, this situation presents great opportunities for improvement in performance through a systems re-engineering, but will require a change in incentives so that everyone is cost conscious and accountable.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Photo: Pencil Writing "Help!"]

Vanessa Bohns and Francis Flynn demonstrate that people in a position to provide help tend to underestimate the role that embarrassment plays in decisions about whether or not to ask for help. As a result, potential helpers overestimate the likelihood that people will ask for help and misjudge the most effective means of encouraging help-seeking behavior.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Photo: Silhouette of Woman in Wheelchair]

Does the removal of high-cost individuals from private insurance markets lead to greater coverage for individuals who are not as high cost? John Cogan, Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel Kessler find that the insurance coverage of individuals with a health condition that limited their ability to work increased significantly in states with high versus low rates of disability.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

The goal of this seminar is to investigate how social technology (e.g., blogs, websites, podcasts, widgets, community groups, social network feeds) can change attitudes and behaviors in ways that cultivate social change. We study the strategies and tactics used by companies and causes that have successfully catalyzed social persuasion.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Robert Burgelman]

This seminar helps participants develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring, and workable in highly dynamic environments. Through informed debate and the writing and presentation of position papers, participants evaluate and hone their views on the seminar's critical themes.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Rick Aubry]

This course focuses on the efforts of private citizens to create effective responses to social needs and innovative solutions to social problems. It equips students with frameworks and tools that will help them be more effective as a social entrepreneur.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - William Meehan]

This course surveys strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations in an era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. It introduces students to core managerial issues in the nonprofit sector, such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All

As a member of Novim's Excecutive Board, Michael Ditmore facilitates discussion of scientific, often controversial, global issues and provides a means for scientists to publish their findings from a non-advocacy position.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Cormac Lynch (MBA '91)]

Cormac Lynch is the founder of Camara, a volunteer-based organization that uses technology to deliver education and skill-building tools to disadvantaged communities in Africa and Ireland.

Resource: CSI Affiliates
[photo - photo - Michael Troutman]

Michael Troutman traded his career as an investment manager for that of a minister, and now works with Bread for the World to care for and empower the world's hungry.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Dr. Patricia Einarson]

With a high-tech background, an MBA, and an M.D., Dr. Patty Einarson has a unique perspective on the intersection of technology, business and medicine.  She leverages this knowledge by contributing to math/science education in the public schools, encouraging the kids of today to become future innovators.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jeremy Sokulsky MBA '04]

Jeremy Sokulsky is working with government land managers, environmental regulators and private conservation investors to restore Lake Tahoe clarity.

Resource: Alumni

Environmental sustainability is essential to business today. In this audio lecture, Alex Cummings of Coca Cola relates how his company aims to double its business in a decade by improving packaging and supply chain logistics through social entrepreneurship. Cummings relates stories of using organic material in plastic bottles and empowering one-woman distribution companies in rural Africa. He describes strategic partnerships to strengthen corporate citizenship in local communities, using renewable resources and recycling projects to enhance international development.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Andy Ruben]

The production and consumption of consumer products carries implications for environmental sustainability, efficient use of inputs, and corporate social responsibility in today’s markets. In this talk, social entrepreneur and sustainability expert Andy Ruben shares his vision for supply chain innovation and sustainable consumerism, through the lens of both individual products and system-wide change.

Resource: Audio
[Video-‪John Roberts: Does Working from Home Work?‬]

 

An interview with Professor John Roberts about his study results on the efficacy of working from home.

Resource: Video
[photo - Stefan J. Reichelstein]

In 2010, REI considered adding photovaltaic solar panels to the roofs of some of its facilities for both financial and environmental considerations. This case discusses the company's experience with solar power generation as well as providing representative assumptions for parameters in the financial analysis.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - global investment]

Institutional investors often favor deals close to home — even though it can cost them dearly.

Resource: News Article
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