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Social Innovation

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[photo - Michael Ugwu, CEO of iROKING]

Michael Ugwu explains the challenges, and opportunities, of building a company in Lagos.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Al Gore at Stanford]

Speaking to a capacity crowd at Stanford's Memorial Auditorium, former Vice President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Al Gore calls for passionate action to reverse "degraded" state of democracy.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Caroline Hoxby]

A new study finds that when low-income, high-achieving students get targeted information about their full range of college-going opportunities, they apply to selective colleges in larger numbers, attend and graduate.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Jessica Uy, second from right, who graduated from the Stanford Teacher Education]

Despite national problems with teacher retention, the vast majority of alumni of the Stanford Teacher Education Program are still in the classroom years after graduating.

Resource: News Article

A class brings together students from across Stanford to create and build products for some of the world's poorest people.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Michael Ugwu, CEO of iROKING]

Michael Ugwu explains the challenges, and opportunities, of building a company in Lagos.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Al Gore at Stanford]

Speaking to a capacity crowd at Stanford's Memorial Auditorium, former Vice President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Al Gore calls for passionate action to reverse "degraded" state of democracy.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Caroline Hoxby]

A new study finds that when low-income, high-achieving students get targeted information about their full range of college-going opportunities, they apply to selective colleges in larger numbers, attend and graduate.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Jessica Uy, second from right, who graduated from the Stanford Teacher Education]

Despite national problems with teacher retention, the vast majority of alumni of the Stanford Teacher Education Program are still in the classroom years after graduating.

Resource: News Article

A class brings together students from across Stanford to create and build products for some of the world's poorest people.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

mPowering has created an app that awards goods and services to individuals facing extreme poverty when they make beneficial choices, such as attending school or seeking prenatal care.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

“One death is a tragedy; 1 million is a statistic,” Joseph Stalin is supposed to have said. The more people we see suffering, the less we care.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

Disseminating insights and know-how across any organization is critical to improving performance, but nonprofits struggle to implement organizational learning and make it a priority. A recent study found three common barriers to knowledge sharing across nonprofits and their networks, as well as ways and means to overcome them.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

Fair Trade-certified coffee is growing in consumer familiarity and sales, but strict certification requirements are resulting in uneven economic advantages for coffee growers and lower quality coffee for consumers. By failing to address these problems, industry confidence in Fair Trade coffee is slipping.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

Executives from 10 major corporations gathered in New York City to discuss the innovative ways that they are putting societal issues at the core of their companies’ strategy and operations.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

The Internet has the potential to do a lot of good in the world, but we must not ignore the emerging strategies of negative influence. 

Resource: Blog Post

The more a business focuses on it’s social mission, the more revenue it will generate. 

Resource: Blog Post

Art museums are having trouble drawing a crowd, what are they doing wrong?

Resource: Blog Post

Nonprofits need to do a better job at engaging their givers in their organization if they want to continue to receive funding.

Resource: Blog Post

Reporting from the 6th annual Skoll World Forum for social innovation

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Tim O'Reilly]

Collective intelligence, man-machine symbiosis, real time feedback loops from sensors… Such concepts are harbingers of a new cooperation between humans and machines. In this university podcast, media expert Tim O'Reilly discusses how lessons from technology can apply to sustainable global development. He spoke at the USRio+2.0 Conference hosted at Stanford.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Maura O'Neill]

How important are science, technology, and innovation to international development? They're nothing less than critical for lifting people out of poverty, says Maura O'Neill, chief innovation officer at USAID, in this university podcast. Speaking at the USRio+2.0 Conference hosted at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, O'Neill discusses how connection technologies, in particular, can support sustainable development around the world.

Resource: Audio

Colleges and universities need an alternative to traditional data systems so that they may better manage their student prospects and information. In this Stanford university podcast, Matthew Schnittman, president of TopSchool, talks about the organization's new online software that features the latest innovations in student management software. He spoke at the Global Education Conference at Stanford.

Resource: Audio

In just over 3 years RISE has become a leading provider of children's English language learning services in China, and has built a significant share of the children's English-language learning market. In this Stanford university podcast, Justin Cahill shares how his organization challenged conventions and disrupted the Chinese market to create this unique enterprise. He spoke at the Global Education Conference at Stanford.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Peje Emilsson]

How does a country best go about developing radical innovation in a public school system? In Sweden, they have done it through Kunskapsskolan, a creative alternative to standard public schools that charges no fees to its students. In this audio lecture, Peje Emilsson, current chair of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, discusses the reasons for Kunskapsskolan's success both inside and outside of Sweden.

Resource: Audio
[Video-DC2VC Panel Discussion ]

Government representatives and venture capitalists came together to hear Stanford student teams speak about the barriers that routinely prevent healthcare innovations from getting to market.

Resource: Video
[Video-Biotechnology, Diagnostics, and Genomics: Panel Discussion]

What are five individuals in biotechnology doing to make the sector more efficient?

Resource: Video
[Video-2011 Business of Education Symposium]

"Business has to be about improving education."

Resource: Video
[Video-The Future of the Healthcare Sector: John Capek]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, John Capek, Executive Vice President of Abbott's Medical Devices business, shares his thoughts on the future of the healthcare sector.

Resource: Video
[photo - Ridwan Djamaluddin]

In Indonesia, warning technology exists to alert people to coming weather catastrophes like tsunamis, but too few people have access to the information. So says Ridwan Djamaluddin, Indonesia's deputy chairman for Natural Resources Development, in this university podcast. He discusses the important role of connection technology in increasing the efficiency of tools and enhancing partnerships between governments and their people. Djamaluddin spoke at the USRio+2.0 Conference, hosted by Stanford.

Resource: Audio

When a group of friends went to work using social media to help pair their colleague diagnosed with leukemia with a bone marrow donor, a project they named the Dragonfly Effect was born. In this university podcast, Stanford business professor Jennifer Aaker talks about how the lessons emerging from this simple and heartfelt enterprise can apply to any group that wants to use the Internet to promote a good cause. She spoke at the USRio+2.0 Conference, hosted by Stanford.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Paul Kedrosky]

Sustainable economic growth -- be it in the United States or beyond -- doesn't come through status quo thinking, it comes through connectivity, flux, and a "collision" of people and ideas. So says Paul Kedrosky of the Kauffman Foundation in this university podcast. Addressing an audience of international ministers from developing countries, and technology and NGO professionals at the USRio+2.0 Conference at Stanford, he argues for entrepreneurism as the path to innovation and growth.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Eric Dishman]

In a world in which there may not be enough capacity to take care of an increasingly older and sicker population, how may mobile and home-based technologies will be used to facilitate healthcare? That's the question explored by Eric Dishman, director of health innovation at Intel, in this university podcast. He looks at how technologies such as broadband can inexpensively support non-acute healthcare services. Dishman spoke at the USRio+2.0 Conference, hosted by Stanford.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Michael Jones]

Technology is increasingly being used to support sustainable development, and Google is on the leading edge of that trend. In this university podcast, Google's chief technology advocate, Michael Jones, addresses an audience of international government ministers from developing countries as well as technology and NGO professionals convened by the US State Department and the Stanford Graduate School of Business on the topic. He spoke at the USRio+2.0 Conference, hosted by Stanford.

Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases

Commissioned by KaBOOM! and authored by Katherine Fulton and alumna Heather McLeod Grant of the Monitor Institute, this case study looks at the challenges KaBOOM! faced and lessons the organization learned while pioneering an online strategy to scale its impact. This strategy involves giving away the nonprofit model online for free to empower others to act on KaBoom's behalf.

Resource: Practitioner Case
[photo - SafePoint]

After reading a newspaper article that predicted the spread of HIV through medical syringes, Marc Koska committed himself to addressing the threat of unsafe injections. He spent nearly ten years in the field, investigating all aspect of the problem. The result was K1 Auto Disable (AD) syringe, which physically prevents reuse by locking the plunger once it has been fully depressed. Koaska shopped the product to the major syringe manufactures, but discovered the produces believe was an inadequate demand to warrant investing in the syringe. Koaska gradually convinced organizations to become customers, but the sales of the AD syringe were not growing fast enough to make an impact.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - SafePoint]

After reading a newspaper article that predicted the spread of HIV through medical syringes, Marc Koska committed himself to addressing the threat of unsafe injections. After much research, the result was K1 Auto Disable (AD) syringe, which physically prevents reuse by locking the plunger once it has been fully depressed. To help raise awareness about the dangers of needle reuse and help stimulate demand for AD syringes, Koska founded a nonprofit called the SafePoint Trust. One of SafePoint’s first activities was to launch an aggressive public awareness campaign in India. As a result of the effort, 26 states in the country switched to using only AD syringes in their public health facilities. However, the change didn't stick, which several states reverting to the use of regular syringes over time. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - H. Irving Grousbeck]

Nuru International was founded as a social venture with the goal to eradicate extreme poverty around the world. This case follows founder and executive director, Jake Harriman, through the multiple HR challenges he must face in building his nonprofit organization.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - R. James Ellis]

This fictional short case sets up a hiring scenario that can be analyzed through the lens of the best practices found in E416 Note on Hiring. A CEO wants to hire a VP of Strategy and Business Development. How will he know what he is looking for and when he has found the right person?

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Condoleezza Rice]

The U.S. has pursued a number of punitive economic sanctions to isolate the Islamic Republic of Iran for its refusal to comply with international inspectors regarding its suspected nuclear weapons program. The effectiveness of these sanctions, however, has been undermined by inconsistent application, inadequate enforcement and competing financial interests from private banks and corporations.To what extent should national governments and multinational institutions restrict private sector activity in the interest of national security?

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn Carroll]

Most brands of organic breakfast cereals were founded by hippies who wanted to make a difference in the world in the 70s and 80s. Since then, many have been taken over by large 'traditional' food companies with the likes of Kellogg and General Mills; Attune Foods is an exception. The case describes Attune's company strategy and the challenges it faces in competition against the food giants.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Ken Shotts]

Comprehensive health care insurance reform was a perennial goal of the Democratic Party. Although reform efforts had persistently ended in failure, proponents of reform saw a new window of opportunity after the 2008 Presidential election.This case reviews the public, legislative, and political battle following President Obama's forum on health care reform. It follows the interest groups with a stake in health care policy, and the strategies that they, as well as politicians, used to promote their objectives within the context of U.S. policy making institutions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The case covers the electric vehicle industry, starting with the history of the electric car and then moving on to the forces driving the twenty-first century automotive industry toward electrification. The case discusses the challenges to mass electric vehicle adoption, such as relatively higher prices, battery longevity concerns, competition, and the internal and external demands on the automotive industry.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The case details the strategic decisions of Nissan's developement of the LEAF, the first mass-produced all-electric car. The case covers the inception and launch of LEAF; the marketing strategy for the case; and an overview of the electric car industry.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Hau Lee]

Mountain Hazelnut Venture Limited was founded with economic, social, and environemental objectives. It planned to distribute young hazelnut plants at no charge to a large number of subsistence farmers in Bhutan; it was also the first 100 percent foreign direct investment company in Bhutan. This is an example of supply chain management, environment, and entrepreneurship in developing economies. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Jesper B. Sorensen]

Based in Nairobi, Kenya, EcoPost manufactures construction posts out of the thousands of tons of plastic waste produced daily by the city. The posts, which are manufactured using second-hand industrial equipment, are frequently used to build fences, park benches, and other objects. Because lumber is very scarce in Kenya, and subject to theft and termite damage, the posts sell very well, and the company has trouble keeping up with demand. The company’s directors are seeking financing to purchase new equipment and scale and diversify their production. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Charles Holloway]

Venture capitalist Atul Kapadia was inclined to provide seed funding for Sujeet Kumar and Michael Sinkula to found Envia Systems, a lithium-ion battery company. Admittedly, Envia was little more than the founders’ vision of an affordable electric vehicle and the potential of playing in a very large market. But for Kapadia, it was precisely these two key ingredients that made Envia attractive and akin to other early-stage investments he had made at Bay Partners.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Brilliance]

Team members at D-Rev - a U.S. nonprofit technology company with the mission to improve the health and incomes of people living on less than $4 per day - became interested in the problem of infant jaundice.  D-Rev confirmed that jaundice was a problem in rural areas where equipment to treat the condition was virtually nonexistent. To address this issue, the D-Rev team created a prototype phototherapy solution for  jaundice treatment product called Brilliance. This mini-case study examines D-Rev's strategy and approach to raise funds for a market-ready product. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Brilliance]

 

When team members at D-Rev — a U.S. nonprofit technology company — became interested in the problem of infant jaundice, they initiated a detailed assessment of the phototherapy landscapes in India and Nigeria and created a prototype for a jaundice treatment product called Brilliance. When D-Rev was ready to start thinking about taking Brilliance to market, the team carefully evaluated its own competencies and concluded that the organization’s strengths were not in product manufacturing or after-sales services and believed it should enter into a licensing agreement to accelerate Brilliance’s market penetration. The challenge was to find the right partner and structure the partnership deal effectively to ensure that D-Rev’s social impact goals would be achieved. This mini-case study explores how D-Rev identified its partner and crafted an agreement to motivate desired behavior.

 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - EMW]

The East Meets West Foundation (EMW) is an international development agency with the mission to transform the health, education, and communities of disadvantaged people in Asia. Through its Breath of Life (BOL) program, EMW provides a complete package of custom-made, low-cost medical equipment to neonatal care providers. As EMW expanded BOL in Asia, it recognized the need to develop more effective therapy for infant jaundice. EMW was interest in an infant phototherapy solution, but they did not have the design capabilities needed to develop the product and neither did its existing parters. This case study reveals how EMW addressed challenges of positioning for continued growth. 

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All

The article examines environmental issues related to supply chains and supply chain management. Attempts to introduce sustainable practices into supply chains often meet with unexpected financial or environmental costs.

Resource: Research Paper

It is unclear if vouchers increase educational productivity or are purely redistributive, benefiting recipients by giving them access to more desirable peers at others' expense.

Resource: Research Paper

Establishments in better managed firms are significantly less energy intensive. Better managed firms are also significantly more productive. These results suggest that management practices that are associated with improved productivity are also linked to lower greenhouse gas emissions.

Resource: Research Paper

Research indicates that, among women and ethnic minorities, perceived inequality reduces the association between self-esteem and academic outcomes.

Resource: Research Paper

This paper examines if perceptions of test legitimacy increase when racial differences on test performance match the racial status quo or when a perceiver's in-group performs better than expected, relative to other groups.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

The goal of this seminar is to investigate how social technology (e.g., blogs, websites, podcasts, widgets, community groups, social network feeds) can change attitudes and behaviors in ways that cultivate social change. We study the strategies and tactics used by companies and causes that have successfully catalyzed social persuasion.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Robert Burgelman]

This seminar helps participants develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring, and workable in highly dynamic environments. Through informed debate and the writing and presentation of position papers, participants evaluate and hone their views on the seminar's critical themes.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Rick Aubry]

This course focuses on the efforts of private citizens to create effective responses to social needs and innovative solutions to social problems. It equips students with frameworks and tools that will help them be more effective as a social entrepreneur.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - William Meehan]

This course surveys strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations in an era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. It introduces students to core managerial issues in the nonprofit sector, such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - Jim Thompson (MBA '86)]

Jim reflects on how the GSB shaped his sense of identity and expanded his idea of what is possible, leading to his founding of the Positive Coaching Alliance, a national nonprofit that has impacted more than 4 million youth athletes.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Karen Routt]

Caring for aging parents is a challenge many face, yet there is no clear path or pattern for how to manage this stage of life. Karen Routt shares her expertise at the nexus between technology and caring for the elderly.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Daryn Dodson]

Daryn Dodson is passionate about identifying and developing leaders with a social conscience. He has turned that passion into action by promoting entrepreneurship in post-Katrina New Orleans and in his current impact investment consulting role.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Ashley Boren]

Ashley Boren explains how protecting the environment can also be good for business. She spoke at the Oct 20, 2011 anniversary event celebrating the school's 40 year commitment to educating socially-conscious leaders.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Amy Saxton]

50% of low-income minority students are not graduating high school on time, and only 10% will graduate from a four-year college by age 26. Amy Saxton, CEO of Summer Search, reflects on how tenacity and emotional intelligence play into life success.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Immigration]

A new study explores the evidence behind the idea that people oppose immigration because they fear losing their job.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Issues on My Mind]

The scholar, diplomat, and businessman discusses America's role in the world.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Ulises1]

One of Mexico's leading businessmen advises a group of artists on their launch of one of the world's first art satellites.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Ned Breslin]

Ned Breslin, CEO of Water For People, tells us where he draws his inspiration from and where he gets his perspective on social change from – punk rock. In the first episode of his “Social Disruptors” series, Ned argues that the story arc of punk, its relentless push for change, offers important insights into how social entrepreneurs operate everywhere, whether they like punk rock or not.

Resource: Audio

Being an innovator is never easy. But tackling the needs of underserved patients and healthcare providers in developing countries can be especially difficult. The idiosyncrasies of the healthcare sector, the contextual barriers found in resource-constrained environments, and the already-difficult-to-implement innovation process, make entrepreneurship in global health time consuming, expensive, and risky. 

Resource: News Article
Corner