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[photo - Pooja Sankar]

An entrepreneur launches the Piazza social learning website to reduce students’ isolation.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Penguin]

On a trip to the continent, students and business leaders explore the impact of warming, and potential solutions.

Resource: News Article
[photo - CODE2040]

Just one in 14 tech employees in Silicon Valley is black or Latino. Code2040 is working to change that.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Myra Strober]

We've made progress, says economist Myra Strober, but the system and potential role models still sometimes fail us.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Companies Emphasize the Environment Over Employees]

A professor of organizational behavior argues that "human sustainability" may pay off too.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Pooja Sankar]

An entrepreneur launches the Piazza social learning website to reduce students’ isolation.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Penguin]

On a trip to the continent, students and business leaders explore the impact of warming, and potential solutions.

Resource: News Article
[photo - CODE2040]

Just one in 14 tech employees in Silicon Valley is black or Latino. Code2040 is working to change that.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Myra Strober]

We've made progress, says economist Myra Strober, but the system and potential role models still sometimes fail us.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Companies Emphasize the Environment Over Employees]

A professor of organizational behavior argues that "human sustainability" may pay off too.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

In trying to improve American public schools, educators, policymakers, and philanthropists are overselling the role of the highly skilled individual teacher and undervaluing the benefits that come from teacher collaborations.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

The Myelin Repair Foundation is creating a process for the rapid development of new treatments and cures.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

POOR ECONOMICS: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty by Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Duflo

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

GLOBAL ACTION NETWORKS: Creating Our Future Together by Steve Waddell

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

EMBARQ, a network of sustainable transportation experts, has grown quickly, thanks to impressive fundraising and the design of a model program.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

The recession should be spurring nonprofits, giving organizations and individual givers to regroup and find innovative ways to address urgent social and global needs that only are getting worse because of the growing economic crisis. Foundations are creatively adjusting to the current economic crisis.

Resource: Blog Post

The author draws a comparison between music’s ability to combine art and science with philanthropy’s ability to do the same. 

Resource: Blog Post

The giving sector, especially in the face of the continuing economic crisis, needs to retool its model for charitable giving and fundraising. Nonprofits, for example, should start looking at building social media into their overall fundraising and communication strategies. Often reluctant to move beyond traditional strategies, whether or not those actually produce positive results, nonprofits should look at social-media tools that are changing the way people communicate, connect and spur one another to action.

Resource: Blog Post

Unionizing charter-school teachers brings to light the ever-present income inequity that takes place within the nonprofit sector. The Nonprofiteer firmly believes that charter schools–like other nonprofits–are the most fertile territory for union organizing, and she’s not surprised to see that organizing professionals have figured that fact out as well. Combine the relative immobility of most nonprofits–the Art Institute of Chicago won’t pick up stakes and move to Singapore–with their routine underpayment and general exploitation of their employees, and it shouldn’t be a surprise when the union comes to call.

Resource: Blog Post

The long-term strength of our nation relies on the level of commitment we have toward innovation. Influx of talent, new mindset and new network technologies are the new convergence of innovation. President Obama must broaden the focus across and among the private, public, and nonprofit sectors—to seek and spark the most promising innovations whether they come from commercial or social entrepreneurs, executives or line workers, community leaders, public servants, researchers, or citizens who don’t fit into any of these categories.

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Pamela Ronald]

Working through social enterprise in improving and securing crop yield, especially rice, scientists have enabled farmers in India and Bangladesh to feed their families and earn a profit from their surplus. In this audio interview, Pamela Ronald, of the University of California, Davis, talks with Stanford Center for Social Innovation correspondent Sheela Sethuraman about how her laboratory, in collaboration with other scientists, developed a variety of rice with sufficient submergence tolerance to survive severe flooding.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Cameron Conaway]

In the nonprofit world, people talk about the importance of failure so often it has become cliché. Failure as a way to learn from your mistakes and improve your work. As a former Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter, Cameron Conaway knows a lot about failure and the value of confronting fear and risk head on, literally. At the same time, Cameron also knows the importance of reflecting and pivoting to become more successful – and he has used that understanding to not only win fights but to write powerful poetry. In this podcast, Ned Breslin speaks with the MMA fighter and poet about this difficult balance and how you know when it’s time to “tap out” of the fight.

Resource: Audio
[photo - John Kehoe]

TCHO, a chocolate factory in San Francisco, uses chocolate production to encourage social entrepreneurship in developing countries. In this short audio lecture, John Kehoe, VP of Sourcing and Development at TCHO, discusses the company’s complex supply chain from grower to store. Through the company’s partnership program TCHOSource, TCHO utilizes technology and innovation to work with its sourcing cooperatives around the world. The goal is to improving the growers’ livelihoods and craft while increasing quality, productivity, and sustainability.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Katie Hill]

Solutions for those facing the tradeoff between economic development and environmental sustainability are related in this audio lecture. International development spurs demand for energy in emerging markets, which increases the risk of climate change. As a result, there is an urgent need for environmental sustainability. Katie Hill discusses how companies can push through this tradeoff. Hill compares the economic challenges manufacturers face with energy in emerging markets with the challenges faced in the U.S.. The contrast poses a compelling argument for the use of renewable energy in factories and supply chains around the world.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Marcia Stepanek]

Social media strategy is essential for nonprofit management. In this audio lecture from the Social Media on Purpose conference, presented by Stanford Social Innovation Review and Tides, journalist and new media strategist Marcia Stepanek discusses a framework for developing social media strategies for nonprofits or social mission organizations. By sharing specific examples and presenting an outline, Stepanek demonstrates the value of social media for nonprofit management.

Resource: Audio
[Video-Gloria Steinem: Ms. at 40 and the Future of Feminism]

Stanford welcomes Gloria Steinem, co-founder and first editor of Ms. Magazine, in celebration of Ms.'s 40th anniversary. Steinem reflected on Ms. Magazine's role over forty years and looked ahead to what feminism may mean for future generations. 

Resource: Video
[Video-Gloria Steinem at Stanford: The Feminist Struggle Continues]

Author and activist Gloria Steinem challenged a Stanford audience to fight social injustice with outrageous acts, and offered several targets in the struggle for equal rights.

Resource: Video
[Video-750 Pages of Tobacco Conspiracy]

Stanford Professor Robert Proctor, the first historian to testify in court against the tobacco industry (in 1998), says the tobacco industry is not going anywhere and in fact, smoking-related health catastrophes and environmental impact are going to get worse.

Resource: Video
[Video-Using Entrepreneurial Approaches to Solve the Problems of Global Poverty]

In turbulent times like ours, we need “hard-edged hope,” says Jacqueline Novogratz, the much-celebrated founder of the Acumen Fund. Affirming that the world is indeed a better place now than it was 40 years ago, she traces her own journey from a childhood witnessing racial inequities all around her in Detroit to a career leading the field of social impact investing. Novogratz rallies the community of Stanford business graduates to be part of the new generation of innovative problem solvers.

Resource: Video
[Video-Conversations in Global Health with Chid Liberty]

Liberty and Justice, a for-profit, socially minded company, is creating jobs and improving health care for Liberian women

Resource: Video
[photo - Ma Jun]

Environmental sustainability is advanced in China by publishing pollution violations in an online open source database. In this audio lecture, Ma Jun, Director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, describes the positive results achieved through the China Water Pollution Map, which provides each supplier’s detailed pollution data. At the Stanford Global Supply Chain Management Forum, Jun describes how a group of NGOs made tangible gains toward environmental sustainability by motivating corporate social responsibility.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Jill Boughton]

A proven way to environmental sustainability is demonstrated through the “Waste to Worth” program at Procter & Gamble (P&G). In this audio lecture, Jill Boughton, Associate Research and Development Director at P&G, shares P&G’s long term vision of getting to zero waste in landfills in emerging markets. At the Stanford Global Supply Chain Management Forum, Boughton describes practical steps toward eliminating waste going to landfills, bringing us closer to achieving environmental sustainability through corporate social responsibility.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Towera Jalakasi]

Towera Jalakasi is an entrepreneur in every sense of the word. Despite her success, she still faces an uphill battle as a female entrepreneur in Africa, where the glass ceiling has yet to give way. In a business environment where women are constantly questioned on their ability to lead and have difficulty accessing traditional funding sources, Towera is a beacon of hope and a confident leader articulating a vision of success. In this Social Disruptor podcast, Towera speaks with Ned Breslin about what it takes to be a successful and innovative entrepreneur in Africa.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Arup SenGupta]

How do you turn a poisonous crisis into a social enterprise? In this university podcast, Lehigh University professor Arup SenGupta talks about his innovative work to remove arsenic from drinking water in South and Southeast Asia, and beyond. SenGupta won the Intel Environment Award at the 2012 Tech Awards.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Lesley Marincola]

In East Africa, 80% of the population lives off the grid and often has to use kerosene fuel for lighting. Lesley Marincola, CEO of Angaza Design, argues that the high retail prices of energy and electric products in developing markets are to blame. In this audio interview, Marincola talks with Stanford Center for Social Innovation correspondent Sheela Sethuraman about how Angaza’s extreme affordability model helps tackle energy poverty in emerging markets.

Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases

Commissioned by KaBOOM! and authored by Katherine Fulton and alumna Heather McLeod Grant of the Monitor Institute, this case study looks at the challenges KaBOOM! faced and lessons the organization learned while pioneering an online strategy to scale its impact. This strategy involves giving away the nonprofit model online for free to empower others to act on KaBoom's behalf.

Resource: Practitioner Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Embrace]

While at Stanford, the Embrace team developed an idea for an infant warmer to help low-birth-weight-infants. As designed, the warmer was small and light, transportable, and easy to use, and had the potential to be produced at a fraction of the cost of available incubators. The team decided to pursue their idea by creating a nonprofit called Embrace Global to further develop and commercialize the technology. Through discussion with its board of directors and other advisors, the team thought transitioning from a prototype to a market-ready product would require funding and considered equity investments. However, the team realized in using private investors, it could be more difficult to justify targeting market segments who are considered small commercially. This mini-case study explores how Embrace decided to pursue a hybrid structure and steps to balance competing priorities in a new model.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Design that Matters]

Incubators can prevent infant deaths from hypothermia, shorten hospital stays, and reduce the rate of neonatal complications that can lead to lifelong illness and disability. Unfortunately, they are far too expensive for many resource-constrained settings, particularly developing countries. Design that Matters (DtM) partnered with CIMIT to develop a concept incubator that was uniquely suited to the context of a developing country, made with parts already abundant in the environment. The results was NeoNurture. Although NeoNurture was never brought to the market, the process of developing this product introduced important insights about designing contextually appropriate projects. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - IDRI]

The Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI) was founded by immunologist Steve Reed in 1993 as a nonprofit global health research center. The institute was distinguished by its emphasis on the practical end goal of getting its products to market. To accomplish this, IDRI drew on distinct competencies of diverse collaboration. IDRI needed a substantial, ongoing stream of funding in order to continue realizing results. However, as a nonprofit, they could not tap into venture capital funding like private firms. These funding constraints made sustaining the company challenging and limited its strategic growth. This case study describes how Reed devised a model to create a for-profit development arms to commercialize select IDRI vaccine.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - KickStart]

Fisher and Moon founded KickStart to design tools that would enable Africa’s poor to launch and sustain their own profitable businesses. The organization’s first product was a line of manually operated irrigation pumps — branded “MoneyMaker Pumps” — that would help subsistence farmers transform their farms into profitable family businesses. The KickStart team believed that to be sustainable, its products had to be affordable and enable farmers to realize return on their investment within a relatively short period. This mini-case study explores this approach and how KickStart structures its business to provide enduring solutions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - KickStart]

KickStart was founded to design tools that would enable Africa’s poor to launch and sustain profitable businesses. Its first product was a line of manually operated irrigation pumps — branded “MoneyMaker Pumps” — that would help subsistence farmers transform their farms into profitable family businesses. When the first MoneyMaker pumps were brought to market, they were accepted by rural African farmers as affordable, versatile, durable, easy to maintain, and culturally appropriate. However,  KickStart subsequently faced significant challenges manufacturing MoneyMaker pumps in sufficient volumes and at a reasonable cost. This mini-case study examines how KickStart addressed these challenges to established high quality, affordable manufacturing for the long term.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - KickStart]

KickStart was founded by Martin Fisher and Nick Moon to design tools that would enable Africa’s poor to launch and sustain profitable businesses. Its first product was a line of manually operated irrigation pumps—branded “MoneyMaker Pumps”—that would help subsistence farmers transform their farms into profitable family businesses. When KickStart was ready to launch its MoneyMaker pumps, it faced the challenge of how to effectively reach and market the products to target consumers in Kenya, Tanzania, and Mali. In these regions, average farmers and their families are physically isolated and have few resources; because of this, it is likely purchasing a KickStart product may be the most expensive purchase they will ever make. Moreover, many farmers understand little about pump technology and cultural norms prevent the use of word-of-mouth sales and 'viral marketing' to promote the product. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William Meehan III]

This case updates the activities of Citadel Capital, a Cairo-based Emerging Markets Private Equity Fund, in light of ongoing political uncertainty in Egypt and the MENA region.

Resource: Academic Case

The Global Environment Fund (GEF) is a private equity fund focused on investments in environmental and energy solutions in both developed and developing markets. The case recounts two previous GEF investments in emerging markets, a South African forestry company and a Southeast Asian waste management business, as examples of successful management strategies for creating value in emerging markets.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - AdaptAir]

In resource constrained settings, bubble CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure) is emerging as a more affordable treatment option for children with acute respiratory infections. However, some healthcare providers cannot ensure a tight seal between the infant's nose and mask which compromises the effectiveness of this approach. AdaptAir team developed a silicone adapter as a potential low-cost alternative. Despite the new product, AdaptAir encountered challenges when attempting to commercialize the device in the market. This case explores the challenges AdaptAir faced in determining its next steps and the lessons the teams learned about creating an accessory versus a stand-alone product.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Consure Medical I]

After watching a colleague struggle with the care of his mother when she was affected by fecal incontinence, the Consure Medical team began investigating this problem as a potential need to address. Even though the team had a broad concept of the need it would address, they soon realized it would require more research to make the need actionable. This case study looks at how the Consure team determined which market to address and how challenges in design requirements to aid product development. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Consure Medical II]

Consure Medical is committed to developing a solution that involves the problems inherent in existing fecal incontinence treatments yet is simple enough for a motivated family member to use. With guidance from top doctors at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), the team developed an indwelling device similar to a short-term implant that offered multiple advantages over available treatment options. With a working product in hand, the cofounders’ next challenge was to determine a testing strategy that would validate the safety and efficacy of the device and support the company’s regulatory strategy. This mini-case study looks at the factors Consure Medical considered in defining a plan, as well as the approach the company ultimately defined.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All

What explains the enormous differences in incomes across countries? This paper returns to two old ideas: linkages and complementarity. These forces considerably amplify distortions to the allocation of resources, bringing us closer to understanding large income differences across countries.

Resource: Research Paper

What could you do for an hour in the first year of college that would improve minority students' grades over the next three years, reduce the racial achievement gap by half and, years later, make students happier and healthier? The answer, Stanford psychologists suggest, involves an exercise to help make students feel confident they belong in college.

Resource: Research Paper

Policy makers need to understand how early-stage companies in their own area work, rather than try to create another Silicon Valley, says Stanford management professor George Foster. He is coauthor of a new report published by the World Economic Forum.

Resource: Research Paper

Although most of the research and public pressure concerning sustainability has been focused on the effects of business and organizational activity on the physical environment, companies and their management practices profoundly affect the human and social environment as well. This article briefly reviews the literature on the direct and indirect effects of organizations and their decisions about people on human health and mortality.

Resource: Research Paper

Organization members overestimate the degree to which others share their views on ethical matters. That is, a high level of "betweenness centrality" increases an individual's estimates of agreement with others on ethical issues beyond what is warranted by any actual increase in agreement.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All
[photo - Peter Henry]

This course gives students the background they need to understand the broad movements in the global economy. Key topics include long-run economic growth, technological change, wage inequality, international trade, interest rates, inflation, exchange rates, and monetary policy.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Erica Plambeck]

This speaker seminar examines the overlap and synergies between the business and environmental fields. Weekly speakers include leaders from both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors.

Resource: MBA Course

This course focuses on the bioscience industry (biotechnology, pharmaceutical, medical device, genomics, and vaccine). The emphasis is on the ethical and social challenges of running companies in these areas.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Myra Strober]

This course examines the strategies that highly educated women and men use to combine work and family. It also explores how managers can help others achieve balance in these two areas.

Resource: MBA Course

Students learn about the relationship between political analysis and policy formulation in education. The course focuses on alternative models of the political process, the nature of interest groups, political strategies, community power, the external environment of organizations, and the implementation of policy.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - William Beckman (MBA '77)]

Bill Beckman and Connie Matsui help launch a GSB initiative called Beacon that provides knowledge, community, and inspiration to alumni with more time and freedom than ever to focus on their passions.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Beth Sawi (MBA '80)]

Beth discusses how Project Redwood channels its collective experience and financial resources to help people in poverty, and the lessons and insights its members gain in return.

 

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Roger Coates]

Roger is currently starting an investment partnership for affordable housing in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Susan Rothstein (MBA '78)]

Susan reflects on her experience volunteering with a grassroots NGO in Cambodia and how she gained a new perspective on both the developing world and herself.

 

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Yohei Iwasaki (MBA '10)]

Yohei Iwasaki and mOasis are enabling farmers to grow more crops from less water and to cultivate previously underutilized land, producing a sustainable environment that significantly reduces food and water shortages.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Rodney Mullen]

Is innovation something new, or is it built from fragments of experience that grow to become something greater? Skateboard legend Rodney Mullen is an innovator of tricks. To this day, every new skateboard trick can be attributed to Rodney’s early creations. Like most social entrepreneurs, Rodney developed something that took on a life of its own, and he found himself struggling to reconnect with the joy he originally found. Ned Breslin and Rodney discuss the struggles of being an innovator and how creativity doesn’t exist in a vacuum. Instead, it is a collection of experiences, teachings, and learning that come from the simple act of listening.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Dara O'Rourke]

Social innovations in the supply chain have the potential for making an impact on a large scale. In this panel discussion, experts describe innovations that are benefiting society and delivering economic value, including responsible e-waste recycling efforts that generate revenue, innovative methods to end child labor in the carpet industry, and more.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Ma Jun]

Environmental sustainability is advanced in China by publishing pollution violations in an online open source database. In this audio lecture, Ma Jun, Director of the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, describes the positive results achieved through the China Water Pollution Map, which provides each supplier’s detailed pollution data. At the Stanford Global Supply Chain Management Forum, Jun describes how a group of NGOs made tangible gains toward environmental sustainability by motivating corporate social responsibility.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Jill Boughton]

A proven way to environmental sustainability is demonstrated through the “Waste to Worth” program at Procter & Gamble (P&G). In this audio lecture, Jill Boughton, Associate Research and Development Director at P&G, shares P&G’s long term vision of getting to zero waste in landfills in emerging markets. At the Stanford Global Supply Chain Management Forum, Boughton describes practical steps toward eliminating waste going to landfills, bringing us closer to achieving environmental sustainability through corporate social responsibility.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Towera Jalakasi]

Towera Jalakasi is an entrepreneur in every sense of the word. Despite her success, she still faces an uphill battle as a female entrepreneur in Africa, where the glass ceiling has yet to give way. In a business environment where women are constantly questioned on their ability to lead and have difficulty accessing traditional funding sources, Towera is a beacon of hope and a confident leader articulating a vision of success. In this Social Disruptor podcast, Towera speaks with Ned Breslin about what it takes to be a successful and innovative entrepreneur in Africa.

Resource: Audio
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