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Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

Nuru International identifies proven poverty-reduction programs and aims to take them to scale.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

The Peer Water Exchange manages diverse solutions and resources to fight the global water crisis.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

In trying to improve American public schools, educators, policymakers, and philanthropists are overselling the role of the highly skilled individual teacher and undervaluing the benefits that come from teacher collaborations.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

The Myelin Repair Foundation is creating a process for the rapid development of new treatments and cures.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

POOR ECONOMICS: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty by Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Duflo

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Arab nations rocked by popular uprisings in recent months face complex, precarious, and often divergent paths toward establishing democracy, says Stanford democracy expert Larry Diamond.

Resource: News Article

Public education that prepares a workforce for tomorrow's needs is the cause that most challenges her, said Penny Pritzker, JD/MBA '84, the 2011 recipient of the business school's Arbuckle Award.

Resource: News Article

A program using cell phones to get anti-malaria drugs to the rural spots that need them most is one program that has helped lower deaths from malaria in Africa Silvio Gabriel, an executive with Novartis Pharma, told a Stanford Graduate School of Business audience.

Resource: News Article
Believers in free market capitalism were appalled when the U.S. government spent $82 billion to bail out General Motors and Chrysler. But the money saved an important U.S. industry and averted a national economic catastrophe Steven Rattner, the man who led the rescue operation, told a Stanford Graduate School of Business audience.
Resource: News Article

Dan Reicher, executive director of Stanford University's Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance, today testified before the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power in a hearing on "EPA's Greenhouse Gas Regulations and Their Effect on American Jobs."

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2010

Used shipping containers become health care clinics in the developing world.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2010

Most nonprofits use social media like Facebook and Twitter as an ancillary part of what they do. A few organizations, however, are using these tools to fundamentally change the way they work and increase their social impact.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2010

A huge leap in the exportation of Argentinean wines can be attributed to new public-private institutions that encourage partnerships between government agencies and local industry.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2010

What it takes to make change in the U.S. State Department.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2010

Most poor people start businesses because they have no other choice, not because they have a burning desire to become entrepreneurs. For these “necessity entrepreneurs,” microfranchising—that is, replicating someone else’s small business model—poses fewer risks and offers greater benefits than does creating a new business from scratch.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

The union of Maui Youth & Family Services, Aloha House, and Malama Family Recovery Center.

Resource: Blog Post

Tips for helping nonprofits do better at recruiting Millennials and Baby Boomers.

Resource: Blog Post

Should the focus be on more fulfilling work—or higher salaries?

Resource: Blog Post

Millennial generation reps will create five technology projects that will reduce the influence of wealth and special interest groups in policymaking.

Resource: Blog Post

First Social Enterprise World forum talks about how to use business to accomplish social outcomes.

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Picture: Fugate]
September is National Preparedness month - are you ready? Natural disasters and acts of terrorism can occur at any given moment. FEMA administrator Craig Fugate encourages Americans to plan ahead in this audio interview hosted by Karl Matzke. Fugate speaks on the shared responsibility of individuals, business, and government to help maintain resiliency after a disaster strikes. Fugate points to valuable resources from Ready.gov that help individuals and businesses prepare and protect themselves for emergency situations.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Mic]
Educational entrepreneurs have made great strides, but they still have a long way to go. In this panel discussion from the NewSchools Summit 2010 conference, several prominent educational reformers, both local and national, share their wisdom. They discuss the radical change in education in New Orleans post-Katrina, the investment strategy and results of the NewSchools Venture Fund, and why it's important to have a political strategy to match your educational goals.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Dan]
Following the 2004 Asian tsunami, the business community saw a need to better coordinate how the private sector works with nonprofit and government relief and aid agencies to respond to disasters. In this audio interview, host Karl Matzke speaks with the Partnership for Disaster Response Chair and Brinks Co. CEO Michael Dan about how the Partnership leverages member companies' expertise and capabilities to accelerate on-the-ground support to address the most critical needs in time of crisis.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Peter Gleick]
Is there a world water crisis? Yes, says water expert Peter Gleick in this audio lecture at the annual Conradin von Gugelberg memorial lecture on the environment at Stanford Graduate School of Business. To the list of environmental sustainability matters plaguing our planet, we can add the fact that we don't have enough fresh, clean water to do what we need to do, he asserts, which results in disease and death in many areas of the world. Gleick outlines the nature of the crisis and offers some answers.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Mic]

Closing achievement gaps in public education is one of the most important civil rights issues of the century. In this panel discussion at the NewSchools Summit 2010 conference, education experts consider how activists and entrepreneurs may draw on lessons from the civil rights movement to address this critical social justice concern.

Resource: Audio
[Video-Hau Lee: Value Chain Innovation in Developing Economies]

Hau Lee explains how value chain innovations can help entrepreneurs in developing economies grow their businesses, and what multinational corporations can learn from them.

Resource: Video
[Video-‪John Roberts: Does Working from Home Work?‬]

 

An interview with Professor John Roberts about his study results on the efficacy of working from home.

Resource: Video
[Video-Al Gore: Leaders Must Supply Vision, Values & Goals]

The Stanford Graduate School of Business View from the Top Series hosted former Vice President Al Gore where he spoke to over 600 students on leadership, solutions for the climate crisis, and sustainable capitalism.

Resource: Video
[Video-Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Perspectives from California]

California, the ninth largest economy in the world, recently launched a new carbon cap-and-trade system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Mary Nichols, chair of the California Air Resources Board, leads this program that could provide a model to support other regional or national efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

Resource: Video
[Video-US-wide Carbon Policy: Two MBAs' Perspectives]

As part of the annual Conradin Von Gugelberg Memorial Lecture on the Environment, Mike Volpe, MBA '13, and Jake Saper, MBA '14, lay out an argument for a US-wide carbon policy.

Resource: Video
[photo - Picture: Hsieh]
Good corporate citizenship starts with your own customers. That's the message of Tony Hsieh, CEO of the online shoe and clothing retailer Zappos.com. In this audio lecture, delivered to Stanford MBA students, Hsieh reveals the secrets behind the Zappos outstanding customer experience, and discusses how the company is helping businesses deliver better customer service using the retailer's culture-building techniques.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Lesueur-Ponssard]

L'entreprenariat social est une démarche récente dans l'hexagone mais pratiquée de longue date dans les pays anglo-saxons. Il s'agit pour les entreprises de concilier l'approche économique et innovante avec des objectifs sociaux et culturels. Dans cet enregistrement audio, Eric Lesueur de Veolia Eau donne son point de vue sur cette économie sociale et solidaire. Il nous livre la vision de Véolia Eau, son expérience au Bangladesh et répond aux questions de l'économiste, Jean-Pierre Ponssard.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Sara Chamberlain]

"People can learn from mobile phones," says Sara Chamberlain, Head of Interactive for BBC World Trust and developer. She launched BBC Janala to "raise the language skills of 25 million people in Bangladesh by 2017". She speaks with host Sheela Sethuraman about how 3 million people already started learning English with in some cases the most basic handsets. According to Chamberlain, making English accessible affordably could be "a ticket out of poverty" for the people of Bangladesh.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Chu]
A new green industrial revolution is necessary to improve America's competitive position, reduce dependence on oil, and mitigate climate change. So says Secretary of Energy and Nobel in Physics winner Steven Chu in this talk at Stanford University. Chu talks about the scientific realities of global warming, technology solutions to address it, and how such efforts may stimulate the U.S. economy.
Resource: Audio
[Video-Gaming for the Greater Good]

What if games were used to solve real-world problems?

Resource: Video
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases

Commissioned by KaBOOM! and authored by Katherine Fulton and alumna Heather McLeod Grant of the Monitor Institute, this case study looks at the challenges KaBOOM! faced and lessons the organization learned while pioneering an online strategy to scale its impact. This strategy involves giving away the nonprofit model online for free to empower others to act on KaBoom's behalf.

Resource: Practitioner Case

This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. One of the team’s primary objectives was to investigate sales and distribution challenges in this space. By conducting a portfolio of field-based pilots, the team hoped to test different models for improving customer access to these safe water products in an effort to identify scalable, sustainable, and replicable solutions. Although specific results varied across the pilots, which spanned India, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya, they collectively gave rise to series of important sales and distribution insights.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project. One of the key objectives of this effort was to explore how the private sector could help make HWTS products more affordable. By conducting a portfolio of field-based pilots in collaboration with commercial partners, the PATH team sought to better understand the effect of different pricing, consumer financing, and subsidy models on demand within low-income population in developing countries. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Laura Arrillaga]

Arrillaga created Silicon Valley Social Venture ("SV2") in partnership with Community Foundation Silicon Valley (“CFSV”), a nationally recognized public foundation that had experience working with individual donors and had established credibility within the philanthropic field. Arrillaga formed SV2 as a donor-advised fund to ensure that CFSV staff would help guide SV2 partners leverage their expertise and funding to select high-performing community organizations, thus generating the greatest social impact. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Hau Lee]

Before opening its first store in India in 1996, McDonald’s spent six years building its supply chain. During that time, the company worked to successfully source as many ingredients as possible from India. However, French fries (“MacFries”) were a particularly tough product to source locally—and importing fries was undesirable for both cost and availability reasons. This case describes McDonald’s India and McCain India’s efforts to optimize the MacFry supply chain by increasing local supply in a fast-growing emerging market using agronomy, farmer relationship development and value chain innovation.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn Carroll]

The case discusses Nike’s sustainability and labor practices from 1998 to 2013, focusing on the successful steps Nike took up and down the supply chain and in its headquarters to make its products and processes more environmentally friendly, and the challenges and complexities it was still facing in its efforts to improve labor conditions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - PATH]

In late 2006, the PATH Safe Water Project received a $17 million grant form the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Its purpose was to evaluate how market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products among the world's poor. One key factor to consider in constructing its pilot studies was the affordability of HWTS products. This case study describes PATH's efforts to use consumer financing as a mechanism for making HWTS produce and supplies more accessible to its target market. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - CycleBeads]

To help address the issue of unplanned pregnancy and maternal mortality in the developing world, researches at the University of Georgetown's Institute for Reproductive Health (IRH) recognized the need for a intuitive, natural contraception method that could meet the needs of families that chose not to use medical or surgical alternatives. IRH developed the Standard Days Method (SDM), a family planning system, and CycleBeads. Despite some reservations related to traditional values, IRH seized the opportunity to roll out sDM and CycleBeads in Mali, West Africa. Unfortunately, the initial launch did not go well and had trouble establishing effective delivery and support for the product. This case looks at how IRH adapted its approach to facilitate more effective implementation of CycleBeads across Mali. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - d.light]

d.light design is a for-profit social enterprise whose purpose is to create new freedoms for customers without access to reliable power so they can enjoy a brighter future. When members of d.light moved to India to set up distribution of their product, the team quickly discovered would not be as easy as they hoped. They discovered it would be difficult to convince consumers to invest in a d.light product as the market was saturated with low-quality, solar-based lighting products. Distribution posed another challenge. This mini-case study evaluates the strategy d.light adopted to differentiate the company and establish its products as credible and trustworthy to earn the acceptance of consumers and distributors. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

Ashoka was a professional organization that identified and invested in leading social entrepreneurs globally. The organization faced challenges as it updated its mission to “make things happen in a bigger way.”

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - George Foster]

The Canary Fund supports the development of methods for early cancer detection. This first case describes the choice to sponsor a high-profile racing event to raise funding and awareness.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

In the mid-2000s, drug eluting stents had been shown to significantly reduce restenosis rates and promised to be one of the most dynamic and complex segments of the medical device industry: explosive growth, product recalls, and intellectual property litigation, but also inter-industry collaboration.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - H. Irving Grousbeck]

David Dodson started the septic company Green River Environmental after mixed results in his previous entrepreneurial ventures. This case tracks three difficult mangerial situations Dodson faced during his tenure as CEO and chairman of the company.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - James A. Phills]

Minnesota Public Radio had evolved from a small public radio station to a network of 38 stations, mainly through social purpose capitalism. The founder came under criticism after creating for-profit ventures to support and build the enterprise.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - James E. Emerson]

A foundation's assets for supporting the process of social value creation should be viewed as part of the organization's overall investment strategy. This paper introduces the concept of the Unified Investment Strategy, an approach to achieving maximum social impact.

Resource: Research Paper

Stanford economists Daniel Kessler and Mark McClellan examine why hospital competition, often thought to be bad, has led to greater efficacy and efficiency in the hospital industry. They examine how costs and benefits are spread among quality quartiles in the industry, noting discrepancies in price and service for those who receive service from low-quartile hospitals, calling to question issues of equality in hospital services.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Joanne Martin]

This article briefly summarizes work documenting gender inequalities in organizations, and the ways that gender theory and research have been ignored and marginalized in organizational scholarship. It then presents the idea of revisioning, and outlines several techniques for exposing hidden gendered assumptions in ostensibly gender-neutral scholarship.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo -  J. Gregory Dees]

This seminal paper defines the term social entrepreneurship and helps shape, what was in 1998, the nascent field of social entrepreneurship.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Joanne Martin]

The paper examines micro-processes that undermine the formal power of high-ranking women in a male-dominated organization. It shows how the capacity of these women to reduce systemic causes of gender inequality is therefore more limited than it might appear.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

The goal of this seminar is to investigate how social technology (e.g., blogs, websites, podcasts, widgets, community groups, social network feeds) can change attitudes and behaviors in ways that cultivate social change. We study the strategies and tactics used by companies and causes that have successfully catalyzed social persuasion.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Robert Burgelman]

This seminar helps participants develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring, and workable in highly dynamic environments. Through informed debate and the writing and presentation of position papers, participants evaluate and hone their views on the seminar's critical themes.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Rick Aubry]

This course focuses on the efforts of private citizens to create effective responses to social needs and innovative solutions to social problems. It equips students with frameworks and tools that will help them be more effective as a social entrepreneur.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - William Meehan]

This course surveys strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations in an era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. It introduces students to core managerial issues in the nonprofit sector, such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - Kate Surman]

Kate Surman, MBA '04, Administrative Director of Strategic Operations, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, discusses how she has leveraged the Public Management and Social Innovation certificate to take her career into a new direction.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Farm to Cup - Root Capital Lending]

A grassroots student effort led by Caroline Mullen, MBA ’12, Catha Mullen, MBA ’13, and Monica Lewis, MBA ’12, now has even more impact through a merger with Pachamama Coffee Cooperative.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Robyn Beavers]

Leading a Social Innovation Study Trip lands Robyn Beavers, MBA '10, in a new industry.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jeremy Sokulsky]

Jeremy Sokulsky, MBA '04, President, Environmental Incentives, discusses how he's drawing upon the tools and training he received from the GSB to help make a difference.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Ashanthi Mathai]

Vision care is something that is practically taken for granted in the United States, but that’s not the case throughout much of the world. Some 300 million around the globe suffer from correctable vision loss, leading, as Ashanthi Mathai, MBA '04, says, “to people accepting their vision impairment and adjusting their lives around it.” The result? A lower quality of life, restricted job options, and even further economic distress.


 

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Ocean]

A new assessment of ocean health gives the world's oceans a score of 60 out of 100. Stanford's Larry Crowder, the science director of the Center for Ocean Solutions, explains why that isn't exactly a failing grade.

Resource: News Article

In just over 3 years RISE has become a leading provider of children's English language learning services in China, and has built a significant share of the children's English-language learning market. In this Stanford university podcast, Justin Cahill shares how his organization challenged conventions and disrupted the Chinese market to create this unique enterprise. He spoke at the Global Education Conference at Stanford.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Peje Emilsson]

How does a country best go about developing radical innovation in a public school system? In Sweden, they have done it through Kunskapsskolan, a creative alternative to standard public schools that charges no fees to its students. In this audio lecture, Peje Emilsson, current chair of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce, discusses the reasons for Kunskapsskolan's success both inside and outside of Sweden.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Todd Rogers]

Applying psychology to the realm of politics shows that giving voters a few strategic nudges can push far more people in the direction of polls on election day. In this university podcast, Todd Rogers, Harvard professor and founder of the political research organization Analyst Institute, shares research that shows how "get out the vote" calls can be far more effective in changing behavior when just a few subtle techniques are used. Rogers spoke at the Stanford Prosocial Briefing.

Resource: Audio

“Why do people create hierarchies when they say they don’t want them? One answer is that it makes thinking much easier,” says GSB Professor Larissa Tiedens. “We produce hierarchies to make our lives easier cognitively.”

Resource: News Article
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