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Social Innovation

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There's a silver lining to growing old, says Laura Carstensen of the Stanford Center on Longevity. The elderly tend to exhibit better mental health status than their younger and middle-aged counterparts.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Liberty & Justice sewing]

Building a fair-trade manufacturing business in Liberia is helping entrepreneur Chid Liberty realize a goal. "You can make money and do good at the same time," he told a Stanford University audience.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

In August 2010 the US government closed ShoreBank, one of the country’s leading social enterprises. Why did ShoreBank fail? And what lessons can be learned from its 37-year record of innovation?

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

The United States and other industrialized countries can learn from experiments in the developing world that use the humble cell phone as a platform for innovation.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2011

Technologies that reduce costs and improve care for the underserved are often the most difficult to scale up. But a handful of strategies could turn things around.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

There's a silver lining to growing old, says Laura Carstensen of the Stanford Center on Longevity. The elderly tend to exhibit better mental health status than their younger and middle-aged counterparts.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Liberty & Justice sewing]

Building a fair-trade manufacturing business in Liberia is helping entrepreneur Chid Liberty realize a goal. "You can make money and do good at the same time," he told a Stanford University audience.

Resource: News Article

Support of proposals including healthcare reform and cap-and-trade environmental legislation in 2010 cost the Democrats 20 legislative seats and their majority control in the House of Representatives, says Professor David Brady. But he and his co-authors warn that the Republicans should not believe victory in the next election is assured.

Resource: News Article

As schools and colleges increase their investment in virtual classrooms, data analysis, and other cutting-edge tools to help students learn, educators are replacing "chalk talk" with technology and entering a new era agreed speakers at the Goldman Sachs/Stanford University Education Conference.

Resource: News Article

"If you don't have a high school education in America, you are chained to limited options," Cory Booker, mayor of Newark, N.J., told the Goldman Sachs/Stanford University Global Education Conference.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

LeapFrog Investments aims to insure the poor on a grand scale.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

Philanthropedia cofounder Deyan Vitanov wants to make it easier for donors to see the impact of the organizations they fund. That’s why he has created a new tool that bases its recommendations on the opinions of over 1,000 experts.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

With these seven levers, social entrepreneurs can foster change in everything from affordable housing to child welfare to poverty alleviation.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

Throughout history, acts of hatred have plagued communities and dominated media attention. The website Not In Our Town is working to combat that by broadcasting anti-hate stories and campaigns.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

London-based organization Social Finance believes that providing job training and other social services to short-term prisoners will make them less likely to commit crimes—and cost taxpayers—in the future.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Social media is helping people self-assemble for social action.

Resource: Blog Post

It’s important to treat volunteers as valuable assets.

Resource: Blog Post

Should social media communities be focused on the means or the ends?

Resource: Blog Post

Pivotal pieces that have influenced the “base of the pyramid” theory as a way for business to alleviate global problems.

Resource: Blog Post

Time to turn to fundraising fundamentals.

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Picture: Nelson]

Giving things away for the prize people are willing to pay sounds like corporate suicide. In this audio lecture sponsored by the Center for Social Innovation at Stanford, Leif Nelson shows it's a pathway to corporate citizenship, increased revenue, and an enhanced company image. He walks us through field experiments he conducted at major theme parks manipulating various aspects of the purchasing experience for souvenir action photos.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Aaker]

How do you view a nonprofit? A for-profit? A dot-org? Or a dot-com? Judgments of warmth and competence drive consumer behaviors such as the likeliness to visit a website or willingness to buy a product from an organization. Understanding consumer stereotypes plays a significant role in how nonprofits and corporations do business. In this Stanford Center for Social Innovation sponsored audio lecture, marketing professor Jennifer Aaker examines the implications stereotypes have on firms.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Mike Norton]

Philanthropy can be good for you, according to Harvard Business School Professor Mike Norton. In this audio lecture, sponsored by the Stanford Center for Social Innovation, Norton discusses the impact of prosocial spending on donors, summarizing his research on how money can buy happiness for the individuals involved in donating it. Norton also talks about steps organizations can take to promote charitable giving by their employees, so they can reap the positive benefits of the associated increase in well-being.

Resource: Audio

A subtle reminder of how money can change one's motivations to be less prosocial and less connected. Experimental research shows that subjects exposed to the concept of money work longer before asking for help, are less helpful to others, create greater physical distance from others, and prefer to play and work alone. In this audio lecture sponsored by Stanford's Center for Social Innovation, marketing professor Kathleen Vohs demonstrates how small reminders of money can have large-scale influence.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Picture: Ned Breslin]
Even after decades of well intentioned efforts by governments and NGOs, clean drinking water and sanitation are still lacking in many parts of the developing world, with thousands of wells, pumps, and toilets lying in disrepair. In this audio interview, part of a Stanford Center for Social Innovation series on water, Water for People CEO Ned Breslin talks with Stanford MBA student Ashish Jhina about the need for new business models and longer-term performance metrics to ensure more sustainable water and sanitation systems in the developing world.
Resource: Audio
[Video-Hau Lee: Value Chain Innovation in Developing Economies]

Hau Lee explains how value chain innovations can help entrepreneurs in developing economies grow their businesses, and what multinational corporations can learn from them.

Resource: Video
[Video-‪John Roberts: Does Working from Home Work?‬]

 

An interview with Professor John Roberts about his study results on the efficacy of working from home.

Resource: Video
[Video-Al Gore: Leaders Must Supply Vision, Values & Goals]

The Stanford Graduate School of Business View from the Top Series hosted former Vice President Al Gore where he spoke to over 600 students on leadership, solutions for the climate crisis, and sustainable capitalism.

Resource: Video
[Video-Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Perspectives from California]

California, the ninth largest economy in the world, recently launched a new carbon cap-and-trade system to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Mary Nichols, chair of the California Air Resources Board, leads this program that could provide a model to support other regional or national efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

Resource: Video
[Video-US-wide Carbon Policy: Two MBAs' Perspectives]

As part of the annual Conradin Von Gugelberg Memorial Lecture on the Environment, Mike Volpe, MBA '13, and Jake Saper, MBA '14, lay out an argument for a US-wide carbon policy.

Resource: Video
[Video-Biotechnology, Diagnostics, and Genomics: Panel Discussion]

What are five individuals in biotechnology doing to make the sector more efficient?

Resource: Video
[Video-2011 Business of Education Symposium]

"Business has to be about improving education."

Resource: Video
[Video-The Future of the Healthcare Sector: John Capek]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, John Capek, Executive Vice President of Abbott's Medical Devices business, shares his thoughts on the future of the healthcare sector.

Resource: Video
[Video-Changing Behavior and Changing Policies: BJ Fogg]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, Director of the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab BJ Fogg spoke about changing behavior to build new habits.

Resource: Video
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases

Commissioned by KaBOOM! and authored by Katherine Fulton and alumna Heather McLeod Grant of the Monitor Institute, this case study looks at the challenges KaBOOM! faced and lessons the organization learned while pioneering an online strategy to scale its impact. This strategy involves giving away the nonprofit model online for free to empower others to act on KaBoom's behalf.

Resource: Practitioner Case

International Paper has engaged in a plan to lease hunting and camping opportunities on its lands. It now must provide support for environmental management programs in the face of declining demand for hunting areas and increased demand for environmentally friendly forest products.

Resource: Academic Case

The executive director of a teen arts and entrepreneurship training program in Boston, Artists for Humanity, weighs issues of expansion, staff turnover, and fundraising. The organization’s challenges reflect those facing many small nonprofits, particularly those with an entrepreneurial arm.

Resource: Academic Case

US Forest Capital has proposed the use of tax-exempt revenue bonds to help nonprofits manage forestland more sustainably. Now the organization must convince Congress to amend tax codes accordingly.

Resource: Academic Case

The chairman of Marine Stewardship Council is charged with implementing an eco-labeling program for seafood products harvested in a sustainable manner. He wonders how the council could get customers to start shopping for labeled products, and how the MSC should approach industry to get seafood producers and retailers on board.

Resource: Academic Case

In February 1999, the Amy Biehl Foundation Trust was preparing to expand its operations outside Cape Town, South Africa. However, a strike at one of their revenue-generating enterprises, and financial irregularities at one of their newest programs, threatened to thwart the Foundation's plans.

Resource: Academic Case

The new executive director of the Coalition of Essential Schools urgently needed to develop a new and sustainable fundraising strategy. He also faced other challenges around organizational structure, value proposition, marketing, and operations.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David W. Brady]

In the late 1990s, Nike had to deal with allegations that its subcontractors were running sweatshops that were marked by poor working conditions, worker abuse, and below-subsistence wages. Nike responds to the public scrutiny, and takes actions that have an impact on the company and the brand.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

Upon her death, Beryl Buck left $7.6 million for various charitable purposes in Marin County, Calif. The case discusses what happened to the Buck Trust money and the constituents involved.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Daniel P. Kessler]

The executive director of Asian Neighborhood Design, a housing and community development organization, attempts to quantify the potential financial and social return for investors in his nonprofit enterprise. The director applies innovative tools, including a true cost accounting framework and a social return on investment analysis.

Resource: Academic Case

The Career Action Center started as a nonprofit to help mid-life women reenter the workforce, but due to various demands found itself catering to men and individuals in a host of age ranges. The leadership realized it needed to address the contradiction in the organization’s mission as a center for women that was open to all.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Hau L. Lee]

Starbucks created a new program to support coffee farmers through a partnership with Conservation International. If Starbucks could overcome issues it faced with implementation of the program, the initiative could go a long way toward improving the sustainability of its coffee supply chain.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The Kinetics and Michael J. Fox Foundations both support research on Parkinson’s disease. This first case describes the creation, mission, and strategy of the two organizations.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Erica L. Plambeck]

Senior executives at Wal-Mart launched the company’s new sustainability strategy in 2005. The case describes their efforts to keep environmental improvement tightly coupled with business values and profitability.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - James A. Phills]

The X PRIZE Foundation originated as prize competitions for significant development in the exploration of outer space. Several problems faced the organization as it began to focus on fields outside of space, including whether prize competitions could work in areas such as poverty.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - James A. Phills]

In 2006, AARP was one of the largest, most well-known nonprofits in the United States. However, the organization faced numerous public relations and strategic challenges.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Glenn R. Carroll]

The authors examine the classic question of how religious diversity in a community affects church membership in a period of high growth and social change.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Kirst Michael]

Students heading for the nation’s community colleges are less likely to be prepared for the demands of college than their classmates heading for schools with competitive admissions standards, says education professor Michael Kirst. Lack of preparation means a higher dropout rate and poses a real threat to the future qualifications of the U.S. labor force.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Susanna Loeb]

New teachers overwhelmingly want to teach in school districts near where they grew up, say researchers, thus creating a “cycle of poverty” for some urban schools where few graduates go on to earn teaching degrees. It’s not just that teachers prefer teaching higher-performing kids, it’s that they want a school like the one they attended, says Susanna Loeb, associate professor in the Stanford School of Education. (June 2005)

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Daniel Kessler]

To make health care markets work, this paper recommends changes in five areas of public policy: tax reform, insurance reform, improved provision of information, enhanced competition, and malpractice reform. Such policy reforms will improve health care productivity, make insurance more affordable, reduce the numbers of uninsured, and increase tax fairness and progressivity.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - David P. Baron]

The paper presents a theory of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and shows that CSR is costly when it is an imperfect substitute for personal giving. The paper demonstrates, however, that entrepreneurs, not shareholders, bear that cost.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

The goal of this seminar is to investigate how social technology (e.g., blogs, websites, podcasts, widgets, community groups, social network feeds) can change attitudes and behaviors in ways that cultivate social change. We study the strategies and tactics used by companies and causes that have successfully catalyzed social persuasion.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Robert Burgelman]

This seminar helps participants develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring, and workable in highly dynamic environments. Through informed debate and the writing and presentation of position papers, participants evaluate and hone their views on the seminar's critical themes.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Rick Aubry]

This course focuses on the efforts of private citizens to create effective responses to social needs and innovative solutions to social problems. It equips students with frameworks and tools that will help them be more effective as a social entrepreneur.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - William Meehan]

This course surveys strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations in an era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. It introduces students to core managerial issues in the nonprofit sector, such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - Kate Surman]

Kate Surman, MBA '04, Administrative Director of Strategic Operations, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, discusses how she has leveraged the Public Management and Social Innovation certificate to take her career into a new direction.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Farm to Cup - Root Capital Lending]

A grassroots student effort led by Caroline Mullen, MBA ’12, Catha Mullen, MBA ’13, and Monica Lewis, MBA ’12, now has even more impact through a merger with Pachamama Coffee Cooperative.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Robyn Beavers]

Leading a Social Innovation Study Trip lands Robyn Beavers, MBA '10, in a new industry.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jeremy Sokulsky]

Jeremy Sokulsky, MBA '04, President, Environmental Incentives, discusses how he's drawing upon the tools and training he received from the GSB to help make a difference.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Ashanthi Mathai]

Vision care is something that is practically taken for granted in the United States, but that’s not the case throughout much of the world. Some 300 million around the globe suffer from correctable vision loss, leading, as Ashanthi Mathai, MBA '04, says, “to people accepting their vision impairment and adjusting their lives around it.” The result? A lower quality of life, restricted job options, and even further economic distress.


 

Resource: Alumni
[photo - why peace can pay]

An economist shows how financial innovation can help reduce ethnic violence.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Paul Kedrosky]

Sustainable economic growth -- be it in the United States or beyond -- doesn't come through status quo thinking, it comes through connectivity, flux, and a "collision" of people and ideas. So says Paul Kedrosky of the Kauffman Foundation in this university podcast. Addressing an audience of international ministers from developing countries, and technology and NGO professionals at the USRio+2.0 Conference at Stanford, he argues for entrepreneurism as the path to innovation and growth.

Resource: Audio

A startup helps school-based instructors of math and English team up with digital teachers.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Eric Dishman]

In a world in which there may not be enough capacity to take care of an increasingly older and sicker population, how may mobile and home-based technologies will be used to facilitate healthcare? That's the question explored by Eric Dishman, director of health innovation at Intel, in this university podcast. He looks at how technologies such as broadband can inexpensively support non-acute healthcare services. Dishman spoke at the USRio+2.0 Conference, hosted by Stanford.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Michael Jones]

Technology is increasingly being used to support sustainable development, and Google is on the leading edge of that trend. In this university podcast, Google's chief technology advocate, Michael Jones, addresses an audience of international government ministers from developing countries as well as technology and NGO professionals convened by the US State Department and the Stanford Graduate School of Business on the topic. He spoke at the USRio+2.0 Conference, hosted by Stanford.

Resource: Audio
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