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Social Innovation

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[photo - Recycle]

Recycling programs abound, but people are often lackadaisical about putting plastic, paper, glass, and metal into those bins. How can we get more people to recycle? An intervention recently conducted in Canada is pointing the way, and the message is all about ... well, the messaging.

Resource: News Article

Researchers applying psychology to the realm of politics are finding that giving voters a few strategic nudges can push far more people in the direction of polls on election day.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Guilt]

Stanford GSB researchers find that how people respond to mistakes can be a "clue to who they are.”

Resource: News Article
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

GSB Marketing Professor Jennifer Aaker says social media can help for-profits, nonprofits, and government organizations address a deficit of trust in our current culture.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Professor Jo Boaler]

Studies have shown that the root of the math gender gap is not differences in innate skills, but settings that undermine girls' confidence. In her research, School of Education Professor Jo Boaler has found more equitable ways to teach math.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Recycle]

Recycling programs abound, but people are often lackadaisical about putting plastic, paper, glass, and metal into those bins. How can we get more people to recycle? An intervention recently conducted in Canada is pointing the way, and the message is all about ... well, the messaging.

Resource: News Article

Researchers applying psychology to the realm of politics are finding that giving voters a few strategic nudges can push far more people in the direction of polls on election day.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Guilt]

Stanford GSB researchers find that how people respond to mistakes can be a "clue to who they are.”

Resource: News Article
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

GSB Marketing Professor Jennifer Aaker says social media can help for-profits, nonprofits, and government organizations address a deficit of trust in our current culture.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Professor Jo Boaler]

Studies have shown that the root of the math gender gap is not differences in innate skills, but settings that undermine girls' confidence. In her research, School of Education Professor Jo Boaler has found more equitable ways to teach math.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

Headline-grabbing problems like global warming and extreme poverty garner most of philanthropy’s money and energy, while less visible but no less important problems like the decline of the news media—one of the foundations of civil society—are often ignored. Without a healthy civil society, however, it becomes difficult if not impossible to solve the other, more readily apparent problems.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

Social intrapreneurs—change agents already working deep within business—are the answer for business’s woes.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

Social entrepreneurs are often reluctant to relinquish control and create strong leadership teams. Unless they make this important transition, the organizations entrepreneurs worked hard to create are unlikely to scale or have the desired impact.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

Clean Energy Works Portland gets consumers—and the workforce—energized about weatherization.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2010

Three types of leadership are needed to build a successful organization.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Nonprofits looking for charity should connect with baby boomers who own small businesses.

Resource: Blog Post

The economic crisis should spur nonprofits to focus on their mission and foundations to give more.

Resource: Blog Post

The recession poses an opportunity for nonprofits to tell their stories using social media as a means of fundraising.

Resource: Blog Post

The Hewlett Foundation president joins the legions of bloggers.

Resource: Blog Post

Heisman is cautiously optimistic about charitable giving in the recession.

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Photo: Donald Shriber]

Successes in global health, such as the eradication of small pox or lowering the rate of infant mortality, take an integrated approach, one that brings countries and agencies together to address the scope and intensity of these problems. In this audio lecture from the 2011 Global Health Series, Donald Shriber of the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC) speaks about the agency's role in strengthening health systems through partnerships, innovation, and policy.

Resource: Audio

Despite falling to number 49 on the list of countries ranked by life expectancy, the United States still spends roughly twice as much on health care per capita as other top-ranked nations. In this panel discussion, Dr. David Shern and Father Larry Snyder discuss the role of the voluntary sector in this period of necessary reform, and what their organizations specifically are doing to improve the quality of American lives.

Resource: Audio

Can business be a power for good? Jean Oelwang, CEO of Virgin Unite, would argue yes. Virgin Unite is the nonprofit foundation of Richard Branson's Virgin Group, a conglomerate of more than 400 world-wide companies. In this audio lecture, Oelwang discusses the need to address root causes of social and environmental issues, the unsustainable nature of the growing disparity between rich and poor, and the potential to make a difference by adapting existing product and service innovations.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Thomas Barry]
Despite negative media portrayals in the United States, Africa is ranked as a place where it is easier to do business than either China or India. So says Thomas Barry, founder of the Zephyr Management investment firm, in this university podcast. Speaking at the Stanford Africa Forum, Barry outlines what makes Africa an attractive place for investors, pointing to its natural resources and growing workforce.
Resource: Audio
What does it mean for a company to fully engage in corporate social responsibility and become a global citizen? In this audio lecture at Stanford, former Hewlett-Packard VP Debra Dunn talks about the opportunities and challenges of implementing a robust Corporate Social Responsibility strategy and aligning with the demands of numerous stakeholders. Dunn draws on her own experience working for the technology giant.
Resource: Audio
[Video-Innovation in Public Education]

In this panel discussion, entrepreneurs in the field of education talk about how to work with the market and apply business practices and frameworks to the problem of urban education reform.

Resource: Video
[Video-What Does It Take to Get Off the Ground?]

Have you ever thought about launching your own social venture? This panel discussion brings together people from both sides of the "start-up" fence—those who started with large financial backing and those who had none.

Resource: Video
[Video-Greening the Supply Chain]

How did Patagonia make the transition to using 100-percent organic cotton in its product line?  Randy Harward discusses the challenges surrounding internal support, raw materials, and affordability as Patagonia greens its supply chain.

Resource: Video
[Video-Environmental Conservation]

Will Rogers, president of Trust for Public Land, discusses strategies for sustainable land use in a context where the boundaries that separate land conservation from public health, housing, economic development, transit, energy-use policies, and urban design are rapidly blurring. Amory Lovins, chairman and chief scientist, Rocky Mountain Institute, which fosters the efficient and restorative use of resources to make the world secure, just, profitable, and life-sustaining, discusses issues in his book, Winning the Oil Endgame: Innovation for Profit, Jobs, and Security. 

Resource: Video
[Video-Clean Energy]

Speakers on the 2005 Clean Energy Panel discuss how wind, solar, and other renewable energy sources have reached the critical mass to appear at least as recognizable slivers on the pie chart of the U.S. energy portfolio.

Resource: Video
[photo - Mark Kramer]

This audio interview from the Environmental Defense Fund's Future of Green Calls covers complex interactions of the philanthropy sector, socially conscientious nonprofit organizations, and for-profit businesses with FSG Co-Founder Mark Kramer. Kramer outlines how corporate social responsibility (CSR) acts as a lever to minimize environmental harms done by daily business activities. Also covered are how natural resources are consumed by industries and a discussion about sustainability practices.

Resource: Audio
[Video-750 Pages of Tobacco Conspiracy]

Stanford Professor Robert Proctor, the first historian to testify in court against the tobacco industry (in 1998), says the tobacco industry is not going anywhere and in fact, smoking-related health catastrophes and environmental impact are going to get worse.

Resource: Video
[photo - Buzz Thompson]
Resource: Audio
[Video-Using Entrepreneurial Approaches to Solve the Problems of Global Poverty]

In turbulent times like ours, we need “hard-edged hope,” says Jacqueline Novogratz, the much-celebrated founder of the Acumen Fund. Affirming that the world is indeed a better place now than it was 40 years ago, she traces her own journey from a childhood witnessing racial inequities all around her in Detroit to a career leading the field of social impact investing. Novogratz rallies the community of Stanford business graduates to be part of the new generation of innovative problem solvers.

Resource: Video
[Video-2011 Roundtable at Stanford: Education Nation 2.0]

Redefining K-12 education in America:  how can we improve our troubled school system and provide a better future for our nation's greatest resource, our kids?

Resource: Video
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases

Commissioned by KaBOOM! and authored by Katherine Fulton and alumna Heather McLeod Grant of the Monitor Institute, this case study looks at the challenges KaBOOM! faced and lessons the organization learned while pioneering an online strategy to scale its impact. This strategy involves giving away the nonprofit model online for free to empower others to act on KaBoom's behalf.

Resource: Practitioner Case
[photo - John McMillan]

This note outlines the business climate for entrepreneurs in reform-era Vietnam around 1996. Entrepreneurs had to overcome a host of impediments in gaining access to markets, and in dealing with licensing and corruption.

Resource: Academic Case

In April 1999 the leaders of a nonprofit that acquired private land for transfer to public use met to discuss their latest internal auditors’ report. They wanted to decide how best to analyze the findings in order to explain to the board why the results did not appear as good as they actually were.

Resource: Academic Case
Multimedia Case
[photo - Image: Chip Heath]

Interplast was the first international humanitarian organization to send U.S. doctors overseas to provide free reconstructive surgery in developing countries. This case and its campanion videocase chronicle the debates that arose as the organization began to shift its focus from direct service to education.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Rick Aubry]

The community development arm of The Roberts Foundation must decide whether to continue its investment in Asian Neighborhood Design. The housing and community development organization has been experiencing operational challenges due to rapid growth.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - John McMillan]

By the mid-1990s, a few years into Vietnam’s tentative market-oriented reforms, the country’s private sector was at a crucial point. Three owner-managers discuss their initial success in such an unreceptive setting.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David P. Baron]

In Africa, GlaxoSmithKline had to determine how to address the AIDS crisis while maintaining business viability. The case details the interventions of Stanford business alumnus Jean-Pierre Garnier to set the public tone for the company and its worldwide operations.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation has approved a $110 million nursing initiative to improve patient care in hospitals. The case addresses how the Foundation can determine which grants to make under the initiative, and how it may most effectively allocate funds.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - John McMillan]

Grameen Bank lent hundreds of millions of dollars to millions of poor entrepreneurs in Bangladesh. Managing Director Muhammad Yunus faced tremendous challenges brought about by political upheavals and natural disasters in this country.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - John McMillan]

This case describes events with Peruvian intelligence chief Vladimiro Montesinos, his network, and his interventions in affairs of the Newmont Mining Corporation. It provides an inside view of how business gets done where the rule of law is subordinated to political influence.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David P. Baron]

These notes discuss the AIDS epidemic including history, treatment, drug pricing, and economics.

 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This case details the 2006 decision by the United Kingdom to deny coverage for a new form of inhaled insulin. In doing so, it highlights the challenges to innovators in managing conflicts over the costs, benefits, and risks of new technology.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Erica L. Plambeck]

In 2007, the issue of global warming brought carbon dioxide emissions to the forefront of Americans’ minds. This paper examines some of the emerging innovations designed to reduce oil consumption.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Hayagreeva Rao]

In December 2004, the president of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement challenged U.S. hospitals to reduce unnecessary deaths by 100,000 in the next 18 months. The case describes a campaign that incorporated lessons from politics and social activism.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David P. Baron]

Inspired by Professor Muhammad Yunus, Jessica and Matt Flannery experimented with micro-lending connecting Ugandan entrepreneurs to friends and family through a pilot internet trial. Kiva, the first person-to- person microlending organization was born.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Jesper B. Sorensen]

As Green as It Gets was a nonprofit economic development organization supporting small, independent producers in disadvantaged Guatemalan communities. The founder pondered how to grow and sustain the organization.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Charles O'Reilly]

The authors integrate two complementary streams of research on ‘fit’ with an organization's culture that document impacts of similarity in values and demographics.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Sarah Soule]

The authors reexamine the relationship between protest and policy change at the agenda-setting stage of policymaking. They find that protest, issue legitimacy, and issue competition account for variation in the number of congressional hearings granted to rights issues.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Sarah Soule]

This paper uses social movement theory to examine one way in which secondary stakeholders outside the corporation may influence organizational processes, even if they are excluded from participating in legitimate channels of organizational change.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Dale T. Miller]

This article describes six experiments that demonstrate the effect of people's tendency to infer that a familiar opinion is a prevalent one among their group. Implications for social consensus estimation and social influence are discussed.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - John Cogan]

In this paper, the authors calculate the consequences for health spending and the federal budget of an above-the-line deduction for out-of-pocket health spending. These estimates are compared to those of past researchers. Implications on tax policy are discussed.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

The goal of this seminar is to investigate how social technology (e.g., blogs, websites, podcasts, widgets, community groups, social network feeds) can change attitudes and behaviors in ways that cultivate social change. We study the strategies and tactics used by companies and causes that have successfully catalyzed social persuasion.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Robert Burgelman]

This seminar helps participants develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring, and workable in highly dynamic environments. Through informed debate and the writing and presentation of position papers, participants evaluate and hone their views on the seminar's critical themes.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Rick Aubry]

This course focuses on the efforts of private citizens to create effective responses to social needs and innovative solutions to social problems. It equips students with frameworks and tools that will help them be more effective as a social entrepreneur.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - William Meehan]

This course surveys strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations in an era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. It introduces students to core managerial issues in the nonprofit sector, such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - Kate Surman]

Kate Surman, MBA '04, Administrative Director of Strategic Operations, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, discusses how she has leveraged the Public Management and Social Innovation certificate to take her career into a new direction.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Farm to Cup - Root Capital Lending]

A grassroots student effort led by Caroline Mullen, MBA ’12, Catha Mullen, MBA ’13, and Monica Lewis, MBA ’12, now has even more impact through a merger with Pachamama Coffee Cooperative.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Robyn Beavers]

Leading a Social Innovation Study Trip lands Robyn Beavers, MBA '10, in a new industry.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jeremy Sokulsky]

Jeremy Sokulsky, MBA '04, President, Environmental Incentives, discusses how he's drawing upon the tools and training he received from the GSB to help make a difference.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Ashanthi Mathai]

Vision care is something that is practically taken for granted in the United States, but that’s not the case throughout much of the world. Some 300 million around the globe suffer from correctable vision loss, leading, as Ashanthi Mathai, MBA '04, says, “to people accepting their vision impairment and adjusting their lives around it.” The result? A lower quality of life, restricted job options, and even further economic distress.


 

Resource: Alumni
[Video-Al Gore: Leaders Must Supply Vision, Values & Goals]

The Stanford Graduate School of Business View from the Top Series hosted former Vice President Al Gore where he spoke to over 600 students on leadership, solutions for the climate crisis, and sustainable capitalism.

Resource: Video
[photo - Jessica Jackley, co-founder of Kiva]

The cofounder of a microlending outfit says entrepreneurs need to "wake up each day and say, 'Now what?'"

Resource: News Article
[photo - Students Help Win $50K at The Big Idea]

Education Everytime, a venture that uses music to direct students through class transitions, got a huge boost last month when 6 students helped the company win $50,000 in funding at The Idea Village’s New Orleans Entrepreneur Week.

 

 

Resource: News Article
[photo - Mulago II]

The Mulago Foundation is a private foundation focused on the prospect of creating a better life for the world's poor. Concentrated in rural settings in developing countries, the foundation's work is in four areas that contribute to this overarching goal. The Foundation explicitly seeks to get involved with early-stage entities in these targeted areas so that it can grow with the organizations it supports. However, one challenge of getting involved with early-stage enterprises is that they sometimes focus too narrowly on the product rather than the capacity of management and development. This case study explores how Mulago Foundation evaluates prospective investments and the factors it considers before coming funds to projects and organizations.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - PSI]

Population Services International (PSI) was founded in 1970 as a nonprofit organization focused on improving reproductive health in developing countries using commercial marketing strategies. Over the years, PSI broadened its mission to address family planning, child and maternal health, and HIV and AIDS prevention, screening, and treatment.  PSI opened an office in Lesotho and in 2010, a donor provided PSI/Lesotho with “a warehouse full” of female condoms (FCs) that the organization could use to help young women in the area protect themselves from HIV/AIDS. The challenge for the team was to figure out how to effectively distribute and promote the FCs since early versions of the female condom were notoriously unpopular.

Resource: Academic Case
Corner