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Social Innovation

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[photo - corn export]

The study, the most long-range and detailed of its kind to date, forecasts the occurrence of severe dry years during the next nine decades in Tanzania and its key trading partners.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Gender Analysis]

Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine and Engineering at Stanford University has developed 11 methods for integrating sex and gender analysis into research projects, and 14 case studies demonstrating the benefits of using them.

Resource: News Article

TeachAIDS, a nonprofit spun out of Stanford in 2009, targets its highly successful animated AIDS education software to specific cultures. Its most recent success: a national "TeachAIDS Day" in Botswana.

Resource: News Article
[photo - AIDS Education]

Family planning counseling could prove to be a cost-effective way to help minimize the number of children born HIV-positive in sub-Saharan Africa, suggests a new study by Medical School researchers, presented this week in Washington, D.C., at the International AIDS Conference.

Resource: News Article

Most methane comes from natural gas, a fossil fuel. Stanford and Penn State scientists are taking a greener approach using microbes that can convert renewable electricity into carbon-neutral methane.

Resource: News Article
[photo - corn export]

The study, the most long-range and detailed of its kind to date, forecasts the occurrence of severe dry years during the next nine decades in Tanzania and its key trading partners.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Gender Analysis]

Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine and Engineering at Stanford University has developed 11 methods for integrating sex and gender analysis into research projects, and 14 case studies demonstrating the benefits of using them.

Resource: News Article

TeachAIDS, a nonprofit spun out of Stanford in 2009, targets its highly successful animated AIDS education software to specific cultures. Its most recent success: a national "TeachAIDS Day" in Botswana.

Resource: News Article
[photo - AIDS Education]

Family planning counseling could prove to be a cost-effective way to help minimize the number of children born HIV-positive in sub-Saharan Africa, suggests a new study by Medical School researchers, presented this week in Washington, D.C., at the International AIDS Conference.

Resource: News Article

Most methane comes from natural gas, a fossil fuel. Stanford and Penn State scientists are taking a greener approach using microbes that can convert renewable electricity into carbon-neutral methane.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2011

According to recent research, people tend to perceive organizations as being either warm or competent, not both—and they are much more likely to do business with the competent one.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2011

Sambazon’s commitment to social entrepreneurship creates a fair market for farmers in the Amazon

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2011

GIVE SMART: Philanthropy That Gets Results by Tom Tierney & Joel L. Fleishman

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2011

Indian villagers struggle to safeguard their earnings and send any extra rupees back home. Can a specially designed banking machines called Tijori, which means “safe” in Hindi, finally provide them with a solution?

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2011

Habitat International has grown its bottom line using a largely disabled workforce.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

The author draws attention to a situation in which adding a new nonprofit may not be a bad idea. 

Resource: Blog Post

The author believes President Barack Obama inaugural speech inspires Americans to do something better in their lives. 

Resource: Blog Post

The author gives an account of the recipients of the Lodestar Foundation and the Arizona-Indiana-Michigan Alliance (AIM)’s prize for the best nonprofit collaboration in the country. 

Resource: Blog Post

Will the focus on economic recovery eliminate the promising possibilities that the Obama administration once had for the nonprofit sector?

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Jay Deady]
How can technology can be used to help minimize some of the greatest bottlenecks in today's healthcare systems? In this university podcast, Jay Deady, CEO of Awarepoint Corporation, talks about how his company's software solutions provide enterprise awareness within hospitals, lowering costs and enhancing efficiency in the acute care environment. Deady spoke at the Stanford Healthcare Summit.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Andrew Thompson]
Resource: Audio
[photo - Barry, Rulisa, Stansfield, Moncure, Nyonator]

Major gaps exist between what health resources are available in the developing world and what is needed. In this panel discussion, global health professionals describe their successes in improving health outcomes in Ghana, Rwanda, and India. They provide examples of how technological and social innovations can be integrated with limited resources. Michele Barry, Director of Global Health Programs in Medicine at Stanford leads this discussion at the 2011 Stanford Graduate School of Business Healthcare Summit.

Resource: Audio
Africa represents a promising frontier for many global entrepreneurs. In this university podcast, Thomas Gibian, chairman of Emerging Capital Partners, discusses his experiences developing a private equity business focused on Africa, and how it has changed over the years. Speaking at the Stanford Africa Forum, he points to areas of future growth for those interested in investing in the African continent.
Resource: Audio
Less than one in 10,000 companies will survive long enough to celebrate their 100th anniversary. For those who do, how does brand identity change over the decades while staying true to its core values? In this panel discussion, the CEOs of three such organizations discuss the rewards and challenges of carrying on a corporate legacy in the nonprofit sector: Peter Goldberg, of the Alliance for Children and Families, Cathy Tisdale, of Campfire USA, and Jim Gibbons, of Goodwill Industries International.
Resource: Audio
[Video-Opportunities In Environmental Area]

How do environmental challenges create growth opportunities, new markets, and innovation? Two Goldman Sachs managers discuss how their investment firm is making the financing of corporate deals contingent upon the incorporation of increasingly stringent environmental criteria.

Resource: Video
[Video-Fundamentals Are Biggest Challenge]

In his 40 years with Chevron, O'Reilly's biggest leadership challenge is communicating the fundamentals of the oil business, that energy is something that has to be produced.

Resource: Video
[Video-Fill Classrooms with Committed Teachers]

Teach For America places thousands of energetic and committed college graduates as teachers in under-resourced schools for their first jobs. Founder Wendy Kopp shares why and how she started the organization in 1980, and the progress Teach For America has been making ever since.

Resource: Video
[Video-Fox Sees Bright Future for Mexico]

Americans are mostly unaware of the enormous progress Mexico has enjoyed since a devastating collapse in the peso in 1994. Former Mexican President Vincente Fox highlights the opportunities, and also addresses the challenges, resulting from the collapse.

Resource: Video
[Video-Say What You Think Then Take Action]

San Francisco's young and charismatic mayor, Gavin Newsom, has suffered his share of punches for taking bold positions on controversial issues. In this Stanford Center for Social Innovation-sponsored talk, Newsom tells of the courage and persistence it takes to make real social change as a leader.

Resource: Video
[Video-A Behavioral Science Perspective on Why People Vote]

The investigation into what messaging motivates people to vote and the effectiveness of facilitating a voting plan during a presidential election.

Resource: Video
[photo - Photo: Aronson and Stachel]
What good is new energy technology if it can't be transported to the regions where it is most needed? In this audio interview, Sheela Sethuraman talks with Laura Stachel and Hal Aronson, co-founders of WE CARE Solar, about the international journey that led them to create one of the world's most portable solar energy systems. As The Tech Awards 2011 laureates of the Nokia Health Award, these two innovators work to bring reliable power to health care facilities all over the world.
Resource: Audio
[Video-Bill Gates Says Foreign Aid is Threatened, but Big Ideas Can Turn the Tide]

Just off a plane from Africa, Bill Gates visits Stanford to talk about innovation, but not the software kind. Scientists and engineers, he said, need to focus on products that help improve the lives of the world's poor even though the market directs people to help the wealthiest.

Resource: Video
[photo - Picture: Daniel Smith]
How can a young nonprofit organization make a tangible improvement in people's health through clean water using only the power of gravity? This was the challenge for Daniel Smith and the AguaClara team when they began work to introduce community-level drinking water treatment plants in Honduras. In this audio interview, Sheela Sethuraman learns from the 2011 Intel Environment Award winners about the importance of using local resources and experts to encourage horizontal learning.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Dean Jansen]

How can nonprofit and crowdsourcing experts collaborate to make media more accessible? In this audio interview, Sheela Sethuraman talks to Dean Jansen, co-Founder of Universal Subtitles, a volunteer platform for doing collaborative subtitling and translation of videos. As the winner of The Tech Awards 2011 Katherine M. Swanson Equality Award, Jansen discussed Universal Subtitles' current challenges and future potential in leveraging internet volunteerism.

Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases

Commissioned by KaBOOM! and authored by Katherine Fulton and alumna Heather McLeod Grant of the Monitor Institute, this case study looks at the challenges KaBOOM! faced and lessons the organization learned while pioneering an online strategy to scale its impact. This strategy involves giving away the nonprofit model online for free to empower others to act on KaBoom's behalf.

Resource: Practitioner Case
[photo - George Foster]

The Canary Fund supports the development of methods for early cancer detection. This first case describes the choice to sponsor a high-profile racing event to raise funding and awareness.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

In the mid-2000s, drug eluting stents had been shown to significantly reduce restenosis rates and promised to be one of the most dynamic and complex segments of the medical device industry: explosive growth, product recalls, and intellectual property litigation, but also inter-industry collaboration.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - H. Irving Grousbeck]

David Dodson started the septic company Green River Environmental after mixed results in his previous entrepreneurial ventures. This case tracks three difficult mangerial situations Dodson faced during his tenure as CEO and chairman of the company.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - James A. Phills]

Minnesota Public Radio had evolved from a small public radio station to a network of 38 stations, mainly through social purpose capitalism. The founder came under criticism after creating for-profit ventures to support and build the enterprise.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert B. Chess]

Napo was developing a compound to treat diarrhea while arranging an innovative public-private partnership to distribute it in the developing world. When that partnership proved difficult to arrange, the founder had to decide whether to continue pursuing it.

Resource: Academic Case
Multimedia Case
[photo - James A. Phills]

A new breed of entrepreneurs is prioritizing social impact over the creation of wealth. This video case examines the insights, aspirations, and impact of three leading social entrepreneurs and the challenges they face in distributing products and services in hard-to-reach places. It is meant to be used in conjunction with cases SI72 A and SI72 B.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - James A. Phills]

Teach for America, a nonprofit that places talented college graduates in teaching positions in under-resourced areas, needed to expand its placements in the San Francisco Bay Area. Case A details the challenges of TFA’s attempt to expand into the San Francisco Unified School District.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David P. Baron]

In 2002, Wal-Mart came under attack for its inadequate pay and benefits, and its negative impact on local economies. This case examines the issues involved.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Laura K. Arrillaga]

A conference at Stanford brought together professionals from foundations to share best practices, discuss emerging innovations, and build professional networks. This summary presents key issues discussed.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Erica L. Plambeck]

From specification to production: FedEx and Environmental Defense started a collaboration in 2000 to develop energy efficient delivery trucks. Eaton Corporation and Freightliner soon joined them to prototype the new vehicles.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn Carroll]

Most brands of organic breakfast cereals were founded by hippies who wanted to make a difference in the world in the 70s and 80s. Since then, many have been taken over by large 'traditional' food companies with the likes of Kellogg and General Mills; Attune Foods is an exception. The case describes Attune's company strategy and the challenges it faces in competition against the food giants.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Ken Shotts]

Comprehensive health care insurance reform was a perennial goal of the Democratic Party. Although reform efforts had persistently ended in failure, proponents of reform saw a new window of opportunity after the 2008 Presidential election.This case reviews the public, legislative, and political battle following President Obama's forum on health care reform. It follows the interest groups with a stake in health care policy, and the strategies that they, as well as politicians, used to promote their objectives within the context of U.S. policy making institutions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The case covers the electric vehicle industry, starting with the history of the electric car and then moving on to the forces driving the twenty-first century automotive industry toward electrification. The case discusses the challenges to mass electric vehicle adoption, such as relatively higher prices, battery longevity concerns, competition, and the internal and external demands on the automotive industry.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The case details the strategic decisions of Nissan's developement of the LEAF, the first mass-produced all-electric car. The case covers the inception and launch of LEAF; the marketing strategy for the case; and an overview of the electric car industry.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Hau Lee]

Mountain Hazelnut Venture Limited was founded with economic, social, and environemental objectives. It planned to distribute young hazelnut plants at no charge to a large number of subsistence farmers in Bhutan; it was also the first 100 percent foreign direct investment company in Bhutan. This is an example of supply chain management, environment, and entrepreneurship in developing economies. 

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Jesper B. Sorensen]

The researchers examine the relationship between income inequality and corporate demography in regional labor markets, and demonstrate how the number and diversity of employers affects wage dispersion.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - John McMillan]

Analyzing a variety of cross-national and sub-national data, this paper argues that high adult mortality reduces economic growth by shortening time horizons. It finds that a greater risk of death during the prime productive years is associated with higher levels of risky behavior, high fertility, and lower investment in physical capital, and that adult mortality explains almost all of Africa's growth tragedy.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - A. Michael Spence]

This article summarizes a session of the 2007 World Economic Forum on Africa, entitled "Unleashing Opportunity: A Blueprint for Africa's Growth." In the debate the president of South Africa, Thabo Mbeki, invited the business sector to engage governments in a frank discussion about the issues and challenges they face in investing in Africa.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Margaret Eaton]

This paper discusses criticisms of the corporate use of ethics advice by bioscience companies, and offers suggestions as to how ethics advisors may be used most effectively.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Sarah A. Soule]

This article examines how interorganizational competition and social movement industry concentration affect the level of tactical and goal specialization of protest organizations associated with the peace, women's, and environmental movements.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Jennifer Aaker]

The goal of this seminar is to investigate how social technology (e.g., blogs, websites, podcasts, widgets, community groups, social network feeds) can change attitudes and behaviors in ways that cultivate social change. We study the strategies and tactics used by companies and causes that have successfully catalyzed social persuasion.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Robert Burgelman]

This seminar helps participants develop strategically informed action plans that are imaginative, inspiring, and workable in highly dynamic environments. Through informed debate and the writing and presentation of position papers, participants evaluate and hone their views on the seminar's critical themes.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Rick Aubry]

This course focuses on the efforts of private citizens to create effective responses to social needs and innovative solutions to social problems. It equips students with frameworks and tools that will help them be more effective as a social entrepreneur.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - William Meehan]

This course surveys strategic, governance, and management issues facing a wide range of nonprofit organizations in an era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. It introduces students to core managerial issues in the nonprofit sector, such as development/fundraising, investment management, performance management and nonprofit finance.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - Kate Surman]

Kate Surman, MBA '04, Administrative Director of Strategic Operations, Stanford Hospital & Clinics, discusses how she has leveraged the Public Management and Social Innovation certificate to take her career into a new direction.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Farm to Cup - Root Capital Lending]

A grassroots student effort led by Caroline Mullen, MBA ’12, Catha Mullen, MBA ’13, and Monica Lewis, MBA ’12, now has even more impact through a merger with Pachamama Coffee Cooperative.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Robyn Beavers]

Leading a Social Innovation Study Trip lands Robyn Beavers, MBA '10, in a new industry.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jeremy Sokulsky]

Jeremy Sokulsky, MBA '04, President, Environmental Incentives, discusses how he's drawing upon the tools and training he received from the GSB to help make a difference.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Ashanthi Mathai]

Vision care is something that is practically taken for granted in the United States, but that’s not the case throughout much of the world. Some 300 million around the globe suffer from correctable vision loss, leading, as Ashanthi Mathai, MBA '04, says, “to people accepting their vision impairment and adjusting their lives around it.” The result? A lower quality of life, restricted job options, and even further economic distress.


 

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Companies Emphasize the Environment Over Employees]

A professor of organizational behavior argues that "human sustainability" may pay off too.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Childhood Obesity Screening May Not Be That Useful]

Professor Lawrence Wein, Jeffrey S. Skoll Professor of Management Science, explains why childhood obesity screening may not be that useful.

Resource: News Article
[photo - China’s Solar-Panel Boom and Bust]

How a mad dash into a burgeoning sector turned into a scramble for support.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Beth Gerstein]

The cofounder of online jewelry retailer Brilliant Earth explains how she built her business. 

Resource: News Article
[photo - Computer Therapy]

The success of an innovative new therapy suggests new avenues for incorporating emotional health resources into educational systems worldwide.

Resource: News Article
Corner