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[photo - Immigration]

A new study explores the evidence behind the idea that people oppose immigration because they fear losing their job.

Resource: News Article
[photo - David Dodson]

Project Healthy Children works with governments and manufacturers to bring fortified foods to people at risk.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Debra Meyerson]

A study of oil rigs shows that a different approach to male-dominated environments can change corporate culture.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Mandy O'Neill]

A researcher says at least part of the answer is that people are more than their potential.

Resource: News Article

A new study finds that a different approach to food-relief efforts in the developing world could save more lives.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Immigration]

A new study explores the evidence behind the idea that people oppose immigration because they fear losing their job.

Resource: News Article
[photo - David Dodson]

Project Healthy Children works with governments and manufacturers to bring fortified foods to people at risk.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Debra Meyerson]

A study of oil rigs shows that a different approach to male-dominated environments can change corporate culture.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Mandy O'Neill]

A researcher says at least part of the answer is that people are more than their potential.

Resource: News Article

A new study finds that a different approach to food-relief efforts in the developing world could save more lives.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

“One death is a tragedy; 1 million is a statistic,” Joseph Stalin is supposed to have said. The more people we see suffering, the less we care.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2011

Fair Trade-certified coffee is growing in consumer familiarity and sales, but strict certification requirements are resulting in uneven economic advantages for coffee growers and lower quality coffee for consumers. By failing to address these problems, industry confidence in Fair Trade coffee is slipping.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2011

Sustainable Harvest grows a new supply chain.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2011

Habitat International has grown its bottom line using a largely disabled workforce.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2011

Direct participation by African villagers proves that process matters, even when outcomes don’t change.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

The author details a Web that tells stories and exposes human injustice and trauma rather than gossip. She proposes this exposure will help drive the change that is needed.

Resource: Blog Post

We must actively withhold support when we see the government acting in a way counter to our ideals and its own. Those of us who supported the President’s election because we share his basic principles and values should express that support by remaining independent and criticizing when necessary, rather than by becoming supplicants to or apologists for the people we put in office.  That’s an idea relevant to each and all of us as citizens.

Resource: Blog Post

The Internet has the potential to do a lot of good in the world, but we must not ignore the emerging strategies of negative influence. 

Resource: Blog Post

Internet tech tools are mobilizing collective action and revolutionizing ways to start a revolution. 

Resource: Blog Post

A youth summit discusses online platforms as a means of catalyzing social change.

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Jake Harriman]

Jake Harriman is using his military experience to revolutionize the fight against extreme poverty. After leaving his position as a Special Operations Platoon Commander in the Marine Corps, Jake Harriman founded Nuru, a nonprofit aiming to bring relief to the poorest places in the world. Jake puts his venture’s focus on finding and training capable leaders in these places, rather than giving these communities quick economic fixes. Through this podcast, Jake Harriman shares his enthusiasm for combating extreme poverty and portrays his excitement for the future of his venture.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Benjamin Cohen]

Globally, 700 million people do not have access to a reliable water source. In this audio interview, the Co-Founder and CEO of TOHL, Benjamin Cohen, discusses how he and his team are improving the quantity and quality of water for people in need. TOHL designs, engineers, constructs, operates, and maintains both conventional and mobile water systems to reach its goal of bringing clean water to those who need it most, in the most efficient and effective way possible.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Michelle Kreger]

A small stove is combating the big issues of gender inequality, physical and sexual violence, and the harmful effects toxic emissions. In this audio interview, the founder of Potential Energy, Michelle Kreger, discusses her social venture, which brings energy-efficient stoves to the people who need them most. In the interview, she explains the goal of the cook stove in minimizing the need for firewood and why this invention generates so much social benefit.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Lieselotte Heederik]

The Nazava Water Filters team sees clean water as a basic right, not a privilege. In this audio interview, the co-founder of Nazava Water Filters, Lieselotte Heederik, discusses her company’s impact on Indonesia by creating appliances to purify water at the household level. Nazava Water Filters provides the most affordable and safest household water filters in Indonesia, which enables families to access clean drinking water without the need to boil water or use electricity. This consequently improves health, increases disposable income and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Katrina Benjamin]

Slave labor is an abject evil that many in developing nations are working to eliminate. At the same time, even if you live far from enslaved workers, slave labor creates everyday moral challenges. Today nearly all of us use items that are tainted by slave labor. In this short audio lecture, Katrina Benjamin describes the degrading conditions of enslaved people, and outlines four specific examples where slavery is a an integral part of the consumer supply chain. Benjamin describes the environmental problems associated with slavery, and suggests ways that commercial and non-profit organizations can work to eliminate slavery through cooperative social responsibility.

Resource: Audio
[Video-Cory Booker's 2012 Commencement Address]

Cory Booker, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey, challenges Stanford graduates to be courageous, never lose faith and always work together during Stanford's 121st Commencement. He extolls lessons from his own father and grandfather through stories of hardship, hope, and humor. Booker encourages graduates to find and join their own "conspiracy of love" -- people who will help lift them up in times of need, provide a community and challenge them to go beyond what they think is possible.

Resource: Video
[Video-Gloria Steinem: Ms. at 40 and the Future of Feminism]

Stanford welcomes Gloria Steinem, co-founder and first editor of Ms. Magazine, in celebration of Ms.'s 40th anniversary. Steinem reflected on Ms. Magazine's role over forty years and looked ahead to what feminism may mean for future generations. 

Resource: Video
[Video-Gloria Steinem at Stanford: The Feminist Struggle Continues]

Author and activist Gloria Steinem challenged a Stanford audience to fight social injustice with outrageous acts, and offered several targets in the struggle for equal rights.

Resource: Video
[Video-Say What You Think Then Take Action]

San Francisco's young and charismatic mayor, Gavin Newsom, has suffered his share of punches for taking bold positions on controversial issues. In this Stanford Center for Social Innovation-sponsored talk, Newsom tells of the courage and persistence it takes to make real social change as a leader.

Resource: Video
[Video-Stanford's Guatemala Service Learning Trip, 2008-1]

On a service learning trip to Guatemala, John Joseph, MBA '08, and classmates visited small producers right up to the Starbucks' organization, as well as NGOs like As Green As It Gets.

Resource: Video
[photo - Jake Harriman]

Jake Harriman is using his military experience to revolutionize the fight against extreme poverty. After leaving his position as a Special Operations Platoon Commander in the Marine Corps, Jake Harriman founded Nuru, a nonprofit aiming to bring relief to the poorest places in the world. Jake puts his venture’s focus on finding and training capable leaders in these places, rather than giving these communities quick economic fixes. Through this podcast, Jake Harriman shares his enthusiasm for combating extreme poverty and portrays his excitement for the future of his venture.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Benjamin Cohen]

Globally, 700 million people do not have access to a reliable water source. In this audio interview, the Co-Founder and CEO of TOHL, Benjamin Cohen, discusses how he and his team are improving the quantity and quality of water for people in need. TOHL designs, engineers, constructs, operates, and maintains both conventional and mobile water systems to reach its goal of bringing clean water to those who need it most, in the most efficient and effective way possible.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Michelle Kreger]

A small stove is combating the big issues of gender inequality, physical and sexual violence, and the harmful effects toxic emissions. In this audio interview, the founder of Potential Energy, Michelle Kreger, discusses her social venture, which brings energy-efficient stoves to the people who need them most. In the interview, she explains the goal of the cook stove in minimizing the need for firewood and why this invention generates so much social benefit.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Lieselotte Heederik]

The Nazava Water Filters team sees clean water as a basic right, not a privilege. In this audio interview, the co-founder of Nazava Water Filters, Lieselotte Heederik, discusses her company’s impact on Indonesia by creating appliances to purify water at the household level. Nazava Water Filters provides the most affordable and safest household water filters in Indonesia, which enables families to access clean drinking water without the need to boil water or use electricity. This consequently improves health, increases disposable income and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Katrina Benjamin]

Slave labor is an abject evil that many in developing nations are working to eliminate. At the same time, even if you live far from enslaved workers, slave labor creates everyday moral challenges. Today nearly all of us use items that are tainted by slave labor. In this short audio lecture, Katrina Benjamin describes the degrading conditions of enslaved people, and outlines four specific examples where slavery is a an integral part of the consumer supply chain. Benjamin describes the environmental problems associated with slavery, and suggests ways that commercial and non-profit organizations can work to eliminate slavery through cooperative social responsibility.

Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases
No Results Found
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

In Januay 2009 QuestBridge, a national leader in making college a reality for bright and motivated low-income students, was able to place 1,500 high school seniors at 30 top colleges. While Quest had been successful, the organization's future growth loomed large and remained in question. The case explores the two paths Quest implemented for finaical and operational growth, but which trajectory offered the most promising strategy has yet to be determined.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn R. Carroll]

Two nonprofits, the Fair Labor Association (FLA) and the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), were created in 1999 and 2000, respectively, to monitor factories around the world for sweatshop-related infractions. The two organizations had similar goals, but very different histories, strategies, and ways of operating. Their shared history has been controversial and tumultuous.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Jeffrey Pfeffer]

In 1991, Frances Conley, the first female, tenured full professor of neurosurgery in the United States, resigned from her position at Stanford Medical School over the appointment of a new department chair who was known for sexual harassment. As she becomes thrust into the media limelight, she wonders what she should do next.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Laura K. Arrillaga]

The CEO of the Global Fund for Women, an organization that seeds and supports women’s rights groups, must examine how to guide the fund’s growth without having it lose its connections with donors and grantees. She also wonders how the fund could do better at assessing grant outcomes and sharing success stories.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Laura K. Arrillaga]

The September 11th Fund was created to support the short- and long-term needs of the people and communities affected by the World Trade Center tragedy. Many foundation leaders evaluated the difficult lessons learned in interacting with the media, and wondered how they could better use communication strategies to demonstrate their accountability.

Resource: Academic Case

In 1998, the chief executive of Mobil in Indonesia considered how he should respond to allegations that Mobil had been complicit in human rights abuses. The cases reflect on the challenges of managing operations in a place like Aceh.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Michael T. Hannan]

In 1999, the World Trade Organization talks in Seattle were sidelined by people protesting against the organization and issues of free trade. The case describes the nature of the protests, and the WTO’s dispute resolution process.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - H. Irving Grousbeck]

The case offers a view into day-to-day management issues faced by entrepreneurs managing a growing business. The focus is the Gordon Biersch Brewing Company, which had to address a sexual harassment lawsuit and other ethical dilemmas.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

In Januay 2009 QuestBridge, a national leader in making college a reality for bright and motivated low-income students, was able to place 1,500 high school seniors at 30 top colleges. While Quest had been successful, the organization's future growth loomed large and remained in question. The case explores the two paths Quest implemented for finaical and operational growth, but which trajectory offered the most promising strategy has yet to be determined.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn R. Carroll]

Two nonprofits, the Fair Labor Association (FLA) and the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), were created in 1999 and 2000, respectively, to monitor factories around the world for sweatshop-related infractions. The two organizations had similar goals, but very different histories, strategies, and ways of operating. Their shared history has been controversial and tumultuous.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Jeffrey Pfeffer]

In 1991, Frances Conley, the first female, tenured full professor of neurosurgery in the United States, resigned from her position at Stanford Medical School over the appointment of a new department chair who was known for sexual harassment. As she becomes thrust into the media limelight, she wonders what she should do next.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Laura K. Arrillaga]

The CEO of the Global Fund for Women, an organization that seeds and supports women’s rights groups, must examine how to guide the fund’s growth without having it lose its connections with donors and grantees. She also wonders how the fund could do better at assessing grant outcomes and sharing success stories.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Laura K. Arrillaga]

The September 11th Fund was created to support the short- and long-term needs of the people and communities affected by the World Trade Center tragedy. Many foundation leaders evaluated the difficult lessons learned in interacting with the media, and wondered how they could better use communication strategies to demonstrate their accountability.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Joanne Martin]

Although both feminist theory and critical theory focus on social and economic inequalities, and both have an agenda of promoting system change, these fields of inquiry have developed separately and seldom draw on each other's work. This paper argues that synergies between these two fields could, and should, be explored.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Sarah Soule]

The authors reexamine the relationship between protest and policy change at the agenda-setting stage of policymaking. They find that protest, issue legitimacy, and issue competition account for variation in the number of congressional hearings granted to rights issues.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Ernesto Dal Bo]

The authors present a model where a long-run player uses money transfers and threats to influence the decisions of a sequence of short-run players. The model is useful for the debate around judicial corruption.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Brian S. Lowery]

Negative stereotypes about various racial groups bombard us every day in the mass media and deposit their residue deep into our minds, often without our realizing it, says Brian Lowery.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Joanne Martin]

The paper examines micro-processes that undermine the formal power of high-ranking women in a male-dominated organization. It shows how the capacity of these women to reduce systemic causes of gender inequality is therefore more limited than it might appear.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All
[photo - Roderick Kramer]

In this seminar, we explore the nature of human happiness from psychological perspectives, and how such knowledge can be applied in personal and business contexts. To illustrate the ideas discussed, we examine in detail a number of fascinating individuals, including Bill Gates, Warren Buffet, Oprah Winfrey, venture capitalist Tom Perkins, Steven Spielberg, Martha Stewart, and the Nobel physicist Richard Feynman.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Sarah Soule]

This course focuses on women's working experiences in managerial and professional positions in business and some nonprofit organizations. Using business cases, small group work, videos, lectures, and class discussions, we examine a wide variety of career-related gender issues.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Garth Saloner]

This seminar will showcase successful women entrepreneurs and the challenges they encountered on the paths to success such as finding funding, dealing with different communication styles, and balancing work and lifestyle.

Seminar participants will study mini-cases, engage in panel discussions and hear from experienced entrepreneurs.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All

Dave DeForest-Stalls wants to help kids stay out of gangs. He's providing mentorship and hip ways to keep youth on the straight and narrow.

Resource: CSI Affiliates
[photo - Federico Lozano]

Federico Lozano is working to alleviate poverty by connecting poor, semi-skilled laborers from the developing world with jobs in the developed world.

Resource: Fellow
[photo - Daniel Grossman]

Daniel Grossman's Wild Planet creates toys that parents love as much as kids. His aim is to inspire learning and inventiveness.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jake Harriman]

Jake Harriman is using his military experience to revolutionize the fight against extreme poverty. After leaving his position as a Special Operations Platoon Commander in the Marine Corps, Jake Harriman founded Nuru, a nonprofit aiming to bring relief to the poorest places in the world. Jake puts his venture’s focus on finding and training capable leaders in these places, rather than giving these communities quick economic fixes. Through this podcast, Jake Harriman shares his enthusiasm for combating extreme poverty and portrays his excitement for the future of his venture.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Benjamin Cohen]

Globally, 700 million people do not have access to a reliable water source. In this audio interview, the Co-Founder and CEO of TOHL, Benjamin Cohen, discusses how he and his team are improving the quantity and quality of water for people in need. TOHL designs, engineers, constructs, operates, and maintains both conventional and mobile water systems to reach its goal of bringing clean water to those who need it most, in the most efficient and effective way possible.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Lieselotte Heederik]

The Nazava Water Filters team sees clean water as a basic right, not a privilege. In this audio interview, the co-founder of Nazava Water Filters, Lieselotte Heederik, discusses her company’s impact on Indonesia by creating appliances to purify water at the household level. Nazava Water Filters provides the most affordable and safest household water filters in Indonesia, which enables families to access clean drinking water without the need to boil water or use electricity. This consequently improves health, increases disposable income and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Michelle Kreger]

A small stove is combating the big issues of gender inequality, physical and sexual violence, and the harmful effects toxic emissions. In this audio interview, the founder of Potential Energy, Michelle Kreger, discusses her social venture, which brings energy-efficient stoves to the people who need them most. In the interview, she explains the goal of the cook stove in minimizing the need for firewood and why this invention generates so much social benefit.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Katrina Benjamin]

Slave labor is an abject evil that many in developing nations are working to eliminate. At the same time, even if you live far from enslaved workers, slave labor creates everyday moral challenges. Today nearly all of us use items that are tainted by slave labor. In this short audio lecture, Katrina Benjamin describes the degrading conditions of enslaved people, and outlines four specific examples where slavery is a an integral part of the consumer supply chain. Benjamin describes the environmental problems associated with slavery, and suggests ways that commercial and non-profit organizations can work to eliminate slavery through cooperative social responsibility.

Resource: Audio
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