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Practically all taxes distort economic incentives to some extent, opines healthcare expert Alain Enthoven. But taxes on healthcare currently under consideration by the Senate Finance Committee are particularly perverse. Instead of promoting prepayment and integrated care with the right incentives-the best long term strategy for keeping coverage affordable-this policy moves us in the wrong direction.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

Does Medicare make a difference?

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

How the Positive Deviance Initiative helps communities solve their own problems

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Solutions to supply chain problems from motorcycle parts in Africa to grocery delivery and solar power in the US were shared at the Advancing Socially and Environmentally Responsible Supply Chains Conference presented by the Stanford Global Supply Chain Management Forum and the Center for Social Innovation at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2009

Texting emerges as a source of confirmation for drug legitimacy.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Solutions to supply chain problems from motorcycle parts in Africa to grocery delivery and solar power in the US were shared at the Advancing Socially and Environmentally Responsible Supply Chains Conference presented by the Stanford Global Supply Chain Management Forum and the Center for Social Innovation at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Lee Scott]

Wal-Mart’s innovative approach to environmental sustainability and its addition of health care services to stores were partly triggered by critics of the company in other areas. CEO Lee Scott spoke with Sloan Fellows.

Resource: News Article

MBA students reflect on their service learning trip to India, where they met an extraordinary group of rural women who have changed the face of their village. These women helped to eradicate preventable disease while empowering themselves as major stakeholders in a community-driven revolution that has become more pervasive throughout the subcontinent.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Dr. Debrework Zewdie]

Dr. Debrework Zewdie, director of the Global HIV/AIDS Program of the World Bank, speaks about mistakes in the fight against HIV/AIDS, highlighting an unfair distribution of medical treatments, a lack of prevention education, and the prominence of other, treatable diseases as reasons for the consistent difficulty fighting the epidemic.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Kennedy]

America's health care system is broken, drug development takes too long and costs too much, and the FDA needs major reform, speakers told the annual Health Care and Biotech Symposium "5 by 20: Five Ideas That Will Revolutionize Health Care by 2020."

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2006

Social entrepreneurs are inventing new technologies to solve the world’s problems – disease, malnutrition, pollution, and illiteracy – to name just a few. But it takes more than a fancy new gadget to make life better. That’s why the organizations profiled here are working with businesses, NGOs, and governments to get their inventions into the hands of those who need them most. —By John Voelcker

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2006

Tough love programs hurt addicts and adolescents. —By Maia Szalavitz

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2006

How retired healthcare professionals are taking care of the uninsured. —By Leslie Berger

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2006

Giving for the long term. By Keith Epstein

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2005

As the branding process of the Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation shows, nonprofits should do their homework before communicating with the public. By R. Christine Hershey & Andrew Posey

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Social media is helping people self-assemble for social action.

Resource: Blog Post

A look at how community advisory committees are faring in the health field.

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Kim Feinberg]
AIDS in South Africa has left millions of children without parents or any resources to help themselves. In this audio interview with Design for Change host Sheela Sethuraman, Kim Feinberg describes how her organization, the Tomorrow Trust, uses education to help these children grow into self sufficient, economically productive, and socially included adults.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Joshua Silver]

In the United States, at least 60% of the population wears corrective lenses. Worldwide, in contrast, only 5% of the population does. Such statistics have led Josh Silver, Oxford atomic physicist, to conclude that more than half the world needs vision correction but doesn't have access to it. In this audio lecture, host of the Center for Social Innovation at Stanford, Silver shares how he decided to "do something useful for the world" by creating specialized, liquid-filled corrective lenses that are now worn by some 26,000 people in developing countries.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Devendra Raj Mehta]

In remote rural areas in India, 18 million people suffer isolation and poverty due to their inability to work. In this audio interview, Jennifer Roberts, associate editor of the Stanford Social Innovation Review, converses with D.R. Mehta, whose NGO gives mobility to 20,000 people a year through the fitting of a high-tech prosthetic limb known as the Jaipur Foot. Mehta discusses the genesis of his organization, which makes the prosthesis freely available to the poor.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Dr. Helen Lee]

In developing countries, many tests for infectious diseases never reach the market because there is little financial incentive to pharmaceutical companies to get them there. In this audio interveiw, Alana Conner, senior editor at the Stanford Social Innovation Review, converses with Helen Lee, whose research department at the University of Cambridge has developed tests that allow for the rapid detection--and thus treatment--of diseases in rural settings around the world.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Larry Brilliant]

Should we be optimistic or pessimistic about the future of humanity and its ability to use social enterprise for productive purposes? In this University podcast, Larry Brilliant cites megatrends that are indeed cause for alarm. Yet his focus is the shining examples of altruism and philanthropy that inspire him ultimately to maintain faith in the ability of the human species to do good and overcome adversity.

Resource: Audio
[Video-Conversations in Global Health with Chid Liberty]

Liberty and Justice, a for-profit, socially minded company, is creating jobs and improving health care for Liberian women

Resource: Video
[Video-Solutions for Extreme Need ]

What if visiting the doctor to get a CT scan was as fun as sailing on a pirate ship? asked Doug Dietz, veteran designer of MRI and CT scan machines. Dietz had seen the widespread anxiety of children who came into the hospital and wanted to change that negative experience.

Resource: Video
[Video-Capital for Early Stage Innovation]

Investors provide insight on early-stage startup fundraising and advice to those interested in starting their own ventures in healthcare.

Resource: Video
[Video-The Global Tobacco Epidemic: Robert Proctor]

How did the global tobacco epidemic start? And what can we learn from it?

Resource: Video
[Video-Pharmaceutical Innovation ]

What can pharmaceutical companies do to contribute to global health?

Resource: Video
[Video-Biotechnology, Diagnostics, and Genomics: Panel Discussion]

What are five individuals in biotechnology doing to make the sector more efficient?

Resource: Video
[Video-The Future of the Healthcare Sector: John Capek]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, John Capek, Executive Vice President of Abbott's Medical Devices business, shares his thoughts on the future of the healthcare sector.

Resource: Video
[Video-Changing Behavior and Changing Policies: BJ Fogg]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, Director of the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab BJ Fogg spoke about changing behavior to build new habits.

Resource: Video
[Video-Changing Behavior and Changing Policies: Todd Park]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, Todd Park, Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, argued that now is the best time in history to be in the healthcare entrepreneur business.

Resource: Video
[photo - Paul Auerbach]

When disaster strikes somewhere in the world, what kind of leadership, nonprofit management, and supply chain expertise are needed? In this university podcast, Stanford professor of surgery, Paul Auerbach, shares lessons learned from the Stanford Emergency Medicine rapid response team's deployment in Haiti after the January 2010 earthquake. His experiences provide a glimpse in to how relevant groups may prepare themselves to better assist in future global catastrophes.

Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases
No Results Found
[photo - Ken Shotts]

Comprehensive health care insurance reform was a perennial goal of the Democratic Party. Although reform efforts had persistently ended in failure, proponents of reform saw a new window of opportunity after the 2008 Presidential election.This case reviews the public, legislative, and political battle following President Obama's forum on health care reform. It follows the interest groups with a stake in health care policy, and the strategies that they, as well as politicians, used to promote their objectives within the context of U.S. policy making institutions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

Embrace was seeking an infusion of funds to support its product - a low cost infant warmer for mothers and babies in developing countries. In parallel, Acumen Fund was continuing to look for organizations with game-changing products and services in need of patient capital on their way to becoming a self-sustaining business. The potential of a financial partnership arose as did other business considerations. This case explores the persepctive of both organizations in their potential collaboration and negotiations.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - George Foster]

The Canary Fund supports the development of methods for early cancer detection. This second case presents the results of the sponsorship created to raise funding and awareness.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The Kinetics and Michael J. Fox Foundations both support research on Parkinson’s disease. This second case explores how these two organizations collaborate toward a common mission.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Margaret L. Eaton]

VaxGen is working to obtain approvals for phase III clinical trials in Thailand for an experimental vaccine against HIV. The company must cope with a host of ethical questions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This case details the 2006 decision by the United Kingdom to deny coverage for a new form of inhaled insulin. In doing so, it highlights the challenges to innovators in managing conflicts over the costs, benefits, and risks of new technology.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Hayagreeva Rao]

In December 2004, the president of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement challenged U.S. hospitals to reduce unnecessary deaths by 100,000 in the next 18 months. The case describes a campaign that incorporated lessons from politics and social activism.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David P. Baron]

Gilead Sciences designs a strategy for delivering an AIDS drug to developing nations in Africa. This first part of the case describes the organization's initial considerations.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David P. Baron]

Gilead Sciences designs a strategy for delivering an AIDS drug to developing nations in Africa. This second part of the case explores the company’s experience with a distribution program.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Rick Aubry]

Two social ventures collaborated with each other to help expand one’s solar energy services from southern Brazil into the Amazon region. The case highlights the core factors that led to the project’s ultimate outcome.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - EMW]

The East Meets West Foundation (EMW) is an international development agency with the mission to transform the health, education, and communities of disadvantaged people in Asia. Through its Breath of Life (BOL) program, EMW provides a complete package of custom-made, low-cost medical equipment to neonatal care providers. As EMW expanded BOL in Asia, it recognized the need to develop more effective therapy for infant jaundice. EMW was interest in an infant phototherapy solution, but they did not have the design capabilities needed to develop the product and neither did its existing parters. This case study reveals how EMW addressed challenges of positioning for continued growth. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Embrace]

While at Stanford, the Embrace team developed an idea for an infant warmer to help low-birth-weight-infants. As designed, the warmer was small and light, transportable, and easy to use, and had the potential to be produced at a fraction of the cost of available incubators. The team decided to pursue their idea by creating a nonprofit called Embrace Global to further develop and commercialize the technology. Through discussion with its board of directors and other advisors, the team thought transitioning from a prototype to a market-ready product would require funding and considered equity investments. However, the team realized in using private investors, it could be more difficult to justify targeting market segments who are considered small commercially. This mini-case study explores how Embrace decided to pursue a hybrid structure and steps to balance competing priorities in a new model.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Design that Matters]

Incubators can prevent infant deaths from hypothermia, shorten hospital stays, and reduce the rate of neonatal complications that can lead to lifelong illness and disability. Unfortunately, they are far too expensive for many resource-constrained settings, particularly developing countries. Design that Matters (DtM) partnered with CIMIT to develop a concept incubator that was uniquely suited to the context of a developing country, made with parts already abundant in the environment. The results was NeoNurture. Although NeoNurture was never brought to the market, the process of developing this product introduced important insights about designing contextually appropriate projects. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - IDRI]

The Infectious Disease Research Institute (IDRI) was founded by immunologist Steve Reed in 1993 as a nonprofit global health research center. The institute was distinguished by its emphasis on the practical end goal of getting its products to market. To accomplish this, IDRI drew on distinct competencies of diverse collaboration. IDRI needed a substantial, ongoing stream of funding in order to continue realizing results. However, as a nonprofit, they could not tap into venture capital funding like private firms. These funding constraints made sustaining the company challenging and limited its strategic growth. This case study describes how Reed devised a model to create a for-profit development arms to commercialize select IDRI vaccine.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - KickStart]

Fisher and Moon founded KickStart to design tools that would enable Africa’s poor to launch and sustain their own profitable businesses. The organization’s first product was a line of manually operated irrigation pumps — branded “MoneyMaker Pumps” — that would help subsistence farmers transform their farms into profitable family businesses. The KickStart team believed that to be sustainable, its products had to be affordable and enable farmers to realize return on their investment within a relatively short period. This mini-case study explores this approach and how KickStart structures its business to provide enduring solutions.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This paper discusses the implications of shared decision-making between the transplant candidate and the transplant surgeon. The authors recommend that prospective shared decision-making should become standard practice for all transplant procedures.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Daniel Kessler]

To make health care markets work, this paper recommends changes in five areas of public policy: tax reform, insurance reform, improved provision of information, enhanced competition, and malpractice reform. Such policy reforms will improve health care productivity, make insurance more affordable, reduce the numbers of uninsured, and increase tax fairness and progressivity.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Henry Peter Blair]

The 2005 G8 debt relief plan certainly sounds generous, but researchers caution it is unlikely to result in large benefits for struggling countries.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Daniel Kessler]

The purpose of this class is to provide students with the economic tools and the institutional and legal background to understand how markets for health care products and services work. The class utilizes case studies, lectures, and visits from individuals in the industry.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This course examines health care businesses and how they use technology (primarily biotechnology, medical technology, and information technology) to improve patient outcomes and manage costs. Through case studies, students gain an in-depth understanding of how new technologies get developed and commercialized in health care, and of how the whole health care value chain adapts to new technologies.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Alan Garber]

This course examines the application of cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis, along with other evaluation techniques, to products and services such as medical care, whose "output" is difficult to measure. It critically reviews studies that apply cost analysis techniques to specific clinical problems.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - Ashanthi Mathai]

Vision care is something that is practically taken for granted in the United States, but that’s not the case throughout much of the world. Some 300 million around the globe suffer from correctable vision loss, leading, as Ashanthi Mathai, MBA '04, says, “to people accepting their vision impairment and adjusting their lives around it.” The result? A lower quality of life, restricted job options, and even further economic distress.


 

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jane Chen (MBA '08)]

Jane Chen's passion for helping others has taken her on an incredible journey from doing social work in China to founding Embrace, a company that sells premature infant incubators.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Karen Routt]

Caring for aging parents is a challenge many face, yet there is no clear path or pattern for how to manage this stage of life. Karen Routt shares her expertise at the nexus between technology and caring for the elderly.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Dr. Patricia Einarson]

With a high-tech background, an MBA, and an M.D., Dr. Patty Einarson has a unique perspective on the intersection of technology, business and medicine.  She leverages this knowledge by contributing to math/science education in the public schools, encouraging the kids of today to become future innovators.

Resource: Alumni

Mark Cafferty is passionate about empowering individuals to be all they can be. He channels funds to employment and youth service programs.

Resource: CSI Affiliates
[photo - Ashanthi Mathai]

Vision care is something that is practically taken for granted in the United States, but that’s not the case throughout much of the world. Some 300 million around the globe suffer from correctable vision loss, leading, as Ashanthi Mathai, MBA '04, says, “to people accepting their vision impairment and adjusting their lives around it.” The result? A lower quality of life, restricted job options, and even further economic distress.


 

Resource: Innovators
[photo - PATH]

In late 2006, the PATH Safe Water Project received a $17 million grant from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Its purpose was to evaluate how market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products among the world’s poor. Several of the early Safe Water Project’s pilots involved experimenting with direct sales models for HWTS solutions. This mini-case study outlines the lessons PATH gleaned through these studies for helping its on-the-ground partners build an effective direct sales presence.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - PATH]

In late 2006, the PATH Safe Water Project received a $17 million grant from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Its purpose was to evaluate how market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products among the world’s poor. One of PATH’s pilots tested a direct sales model in Kenya by making a durable safe water product — a ceramic water pot (CWP) — available through a basket of goods approach. PATH partnered vendors were enthusiastic; however consumers who generality weren't familiar with CWPs wanted to interact with the device before purchase. Vendors were unable to carry the bulky and fragile CWPs long distance. This study explores the creative solution PATH devised to address these issues.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - LifeStraw]

Vestergaard Frandsen (VF) is a for-profit company that operates under a humanitarian entrepreneurship business model. The company’s leading products include PermaNet long-lasting insecticidal nets and LifeStraw water filters. VF was convinced that its LifeStraw Family product could make an immediate and significant difference in addressing the safe water needs of households in developing countries. The challenge was how to make it affordable for its target audience. While VF considered its options, CEO Mikkel Vestergaard Frandsen decided to launch an integrated campaign to help prevent the spread of malaria, diarrheal disease, and HIV in Western Kenya.Witnessing the success of the program, the Kenyan government asked VF to scale it up across the Western Province. However, identifying traditional forms of funding for point-of-use water filters at scale remained a challenge.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Gradian]

After observing too many unnecessary injuries and deaths caused by surgeries that were interrupted or canceled due to the unavailability of anesthesia, Dr. Paul Fenton designed a devices called the Universal Anesthesia Machine (UAM) that could deliver safe, reliable anesthesia even in the midst of a power outage. On of Gradian Health System's early challenges was determining how to position and market the UAM to four distinct but interconnected stakeholder groups. They were able to  to get off the ground mostly through referrals, but Gradian did not consider this to be a sustainable approach. The cast study examines how Gradian developed a comprehensive marketing strategy for stimulating UAM adoption. 

Resource: Academic Case
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