Skip to Content
Change lives. Change organizations. Change the world.

Center for
Social Innovation

Center for Social Innovation

Healthcare

Search Resources:

Research Resources


[photo - Global Healthcare]

In an interview with Kewen Jin, the serial entrepreneurs discusses the rapid growth of China's health care industry and the idea of "innovation by subtraction."

Resource: News Article
[photo - Medicine Technology]

A talk with a Stanford dermatologist and entrepreneur who cofounded an internet alternative to the doctors’ office.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

Business and government leaders, entrepreneurs, academics, and students gather this week at the Stanford Graduate School of Business for the 2012 Healthcare Innovation Summit to examine the forces shaping the future of health care and discuss practical solutions to some of our toughest health care problems. In an online forum, Stefanos Zenios responds to reader questions on innovation in the field.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Beating depression with brain control]

Using brain imaging and a video game, researchers teach girls at risk of depression how to train their brains away from negative situations.

Resource: News Article

A new generation of medical "rock stars" are blending cutting-edge technology with reams of old-fashioned data to help drive innovation, said Todd Park, chief technology officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and one of the participants in the 2011 Healthcare Summit held at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Global Healthcare]

In an interview with Kewen Jin, the serial entrepreneurs discusses the rapid growth of China's health care industry and the idea of "innovation by subtraction."

Resource: News Article
[photo - Medicine Technology]

A talk with a Stanford dermatologist and entrepreneur who cofounded an internet alternative to the doctors’ office.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

Business and government leaders, entrepreneurs, academics, and students gather this week at the Stanford Graduate School of Business for the 2012 Healthcare Innovation Summit to examine the forces shaping the future of health care and discuss practical solutions to some of our toughest health care problems. In an online forum, Stefanos Zenios responds to reader questions on innovation in the field.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Beating depression with brain control]

Using brain imaging and a video game, researchers teach girls at risk of depression how to train their brains away from negative situations.

Resource: News Article

A new generation of medical "rock stars" are blending cutting-edge technology with reams of old-fashioned data to help drive innovation, said Todd Park, chief technology officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and one of the participants in the 2011 Healthcare Summit held at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2008

Jimmy Carter details his ongoing efforts to make a difference as John Q. Citizen.  Review by Joshua Weissburg

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2007

How for-profit clinics are healing and enriching the rural poor in Kenya. By Jessica Flannery

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2007

The Montana Meth Project’s graphic ads saturate TV, radio, billboards, and newspapers to portray the reality of methamphetamine use, in all its grit. Scabs and body sores are just the beginning. So far, the shock factor is working. By Suzy Oudsema & Rick Wedell

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2007

Many Iraq War veterans can’t shake the feeling of being constantly imperiled, and their therapists, in turn, may develop traumatic stress symptoms themselves. A new study tells how organizations can protect their frontline providers from psychic distress.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2007

How four Chicago-area cancer support centers created a fifth nonprofit to pool their strengths. By Don Haider

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Social media is helping people self-assemble for social action.

Resource: Blog Post

A look at how community advisory committees are faring in the health field.

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Thomas M. Siebel]

The abuse of the synthetic drug known as methamphetamine has become a top crime problem in the United States, and now a global epidemic. In this audio lecture, part of the Stanford Social Innovation Review's conference on evaluation, IT leader and philanthropist Thomas Siebel discusses the nature of meth addiction as well as the efforts of the Meth Project, a large-scale prevention program aimed at reducing first-time meth use through public service messaging, public policy, and community outreach.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Robert Klein]
When President Bush set limits on stem cell research in 2001, millions of families who were hopeful that such research could help alleviate the diseases of their loved ones were devastated. In this Stanford Center for Social Innovation audio lecture, attorney Robert Klein discusses his efforts to author and push through legislation in California which, so far, has succeeded in advancing such research. Sharing personal and political struggles, Klein movingly underscores the urgency behind his quest.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Photo: Mechai Viravaidya]
When most people think of condoms, they get a little embarrassed and uncomfortable, but not Mechai Viravaidya. Known in Thailand as the "Condom King" Viravaidya began nearly 40 years ago trying to demystify condoms and focus public attention on the public health aspects of contraceptives. Since then, he has become a leader in critical public health issues like poverty, family planning, and HIV/AIDS. In this interview with host Sheela Sethuraman, Viravaidya offers pragmatic answers to these problems.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Photo: Magda Iskander]
Having an elderly parent with failing health and being unable to provide adequate care out of one's home poses a difficult enough challenge in the United States, let alone in Cairo, Egypt, where home services are scarce. In this audio interview with host Sheela Sethuraman, Magda Iskander describes how she founded Care With Love to fill the need in Cairo for short- and long-term home health care through well-trained and compassionate home health care providers.
Resource: Audio
[photo - Photo: Christopher J. Elias]
PATH (Program for Appropriate Technology and Health) is a nonprofit organization designed to ensure that the benefits of innovation in science and technology are available to developing countries and remotely located, low-income groups. In this audio interview, host Sheela Sethuraman speaks with Dr. Christopher Elias, president and CEO of PATH, about PATH's origins, accomplishments, and challenges.
Resource: Audio
[Video-Biotechnology, Diagnostics, and Genomics: Panel Discussion]

What are five individuals in biotechnology doing to make the sector more efficient?

Resource: Video
[Video-The Future of the Healthcare Sector: John Capek]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, John Capek, Executive Vice President of Abbott's Medical Devices business, shares his thoughts on the future of the healthcare sector.

Resource: Video
[Video-Changing Behavior and Changing Policies: BJ Fogg]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, Director of the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab BJ Fogg spoke about changing behavior to build new habits.

Resource: Video
[Video-Changing Behavior and Changing Policies: Todd Park]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, Todd Park, Chief Technology Officer of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, argued that now is the best time in history to be in the healthcare entrepreneur business.

Resource: Video
[Video-New Biodesign Book Tackles Innovation: Prof. Stefanos Zenios]

Q&A with Stefano Zenios on his new book, Biodesign: The Process of Innovating Medical Technologies.

Resource: Video
[Video-The Global Tobacco Epidemic: Robert Proctor]

How did the global tobacco epidemic start? And what can we learn from it?

Resource: Video
[Video-Pharmaceutical Innovation ]

What can pharmaceutical companies do to contribute to global health?

Resource: Video
[Video-Changing Behaviors and Changing Policies: Sheena Iyengar]

At the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit, Sheena Iyengar, Professor of Business at Columbia University's Business School, shared her research on why people make the choices they do.

Resource: Video
[Video-Using Technology to Redesign Delivery of Care: Andrew Thompson ]

Andrew Thompson, CEO of Proteus Biomedical, reveals how technology can be used to make healthcare accessible to everyone in the world at the 2011 GSB Healthcare Summit.

Resource: Video
[Video-Incentivizing Efficient Healthcare through Technology: Richard Migliori]

"You are more likely to have your plan of care influenced by your zipcode than the stage of your disease," says Richard Migliori. "30% of our expenditures could be reduced if we have a normalization of this variation."

Resource: Video
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases
No Results Found
[photo - PSI]

Population Services International (PSI) was founded in 1970 as a nonprofit organization focused on improving reproductive health in developing countries using commercial marketing strategies. As part of ongoing efforts to provide critical health services in developing countries, PSI sought to address the high unmet demand for family planning in Pakistan. PSI learned that the financial incentives were low and that few providers actually had the training to counsel clients. The case study describes how PSI devised and implemented a social franchising model to rapidly address these needs and achieve scale in the target communities.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - LifeStraw]

Vestergaard Frandsen (VF) is a for-profit company that operates under a humanitarian entrepreneurship business model. The company’s leading products include PermaNet long-lasting insecticidal nets and LifeStraw water filters. VF was convinced that its LifeStraw Family product could make an immediate and significant difference in addressing the safe water needs of households in developing countries. The challenge was how to make it affordable for its target audience. While VF considered its options, CEO Mikkel Vestergaard Frandsen decided to launch an integrated campaign to help prevent the spread of malaria, diarrheal disease, and HIV in Western Kenya.Witnessing the success of the program, the Kenyan government asked VF to scale it up across the Western Province. However, identifying traditional forms of funding for point-of-use water filters at scale remained a challenge.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - PATH]

In late 2006, the PATH Safe Water Project received a $17 million grant from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Its purpose was to evaluate how market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products among the world’s poor. Several of the early Safe Water Project’s pilots involved experimenting with direct sales models for HWTS solutions. This mini-case study outlines the lessons PATH gleaned through these studies for helping its on-the-ground partners build an effective direct sales presence.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - PATH]

In late 2006, the PATH Safe Water Project received a $17 million grant from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Its purpose was to evaluate how market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) products among the world’s poor. One of PATH’s pilots tested a direct sales model in Kenya by making a durable safe water product — a ceramic water pot (CWP) — available through a basket of goods approach. PATH partnered vendors were enthusiastic; however consumers who generality weren't familiar with CWPs wanted to interact with the device before purchase. Vendors were unable to carry the bulky and fragile CWPs long distance. This study explores the creative solution PATH devised to address these issues.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Gradian]

After observing too many unnecessary injuries and deaths caused by surgeries that were interrupted or canceled due to the unavailability of anesthesia, Dr. Paul Fenton designed a device called the Universal Anaesthesia Machine (UAM) that could deliver safe, reliable anesthesia even in the midst of a power outage. Unfortunately, Fenton was unable to convince investors to provide funding so he could further develop his innovation. 

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Photo: Prescription Drugs and Money]

The study surveys a large, national sample of American adults about their willingness to pay for health reform. David Brady and Daniel Kessler find that self-identified Republicans, older Americans, and high-income Americans are less supportive of reform.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Margaret Eaton]

This paper discusses criticisms of the corporate use of ethics advice by bioscience companies, and offers suggestions as to how ethics advisors may be used most effectively.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - S.A. Zenios]

How much are we—and should we be—willing to pay, as a society, for improving health outcomes? The authors discuss how making medical decisions based on their cost-effectiveness leads to profound ethical dilemmas.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Alain Enthoven]

The author argues for health care reform by opening the U.S. health insurance market to competition.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - S.A. Zenios]

What's the optimal frequency of hemodialysis for patients with ESRD? The authors explore the hypothesis that more frequent dialysis not only improves quality of life and longevity, but also reduces the overall cost of treatment.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All

The two-quarter Elective Course series provides lectures from a diverse group of faculty that expose students to the practical aspects of technology invention and development. The class features a presentation or discussion from one of the guest speakers or faculty. Students work in small project teams in the Biodesign prototyping lab or bench space, collaborating with the fellows of the program.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Daniel Kessler]

The purpose of this class is to provide students with the economic tools and the institutional and legal background to understand how markets for health care products and services work. The class utilizes case studies, lectures, and visits from individuals in the industry.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Stefanos Zenios]

This course examines health care businesses and how they use technology (primarily biotechnology, medical technology, and information technology) to improve patient outcomes and manage costs. Through case studies, students gain an in-depth understanding of how new technologies get developed and commercialized in health care, and of how the whole health care value chain adapts to new technologies.

Resource: MBA Course
[photo - Alan Garber]

This course examines the application of cost-effectiveness and cost-benefit analysis, along with other evaluation techniques, to products and services such as medical care, whose "output" is difficult to measure. It critically reviews studies that apply cost analysis techniques to specific clinical problems.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All
[photo - Ashanthi Mathai]

Vision care is something that is practically taken for granted in the United States, but that’s not the case throughout much of the world. Some 300 million around the globe suffer from correctable vision loss, leading, as Ashanthi Mathai, MBA '04, says, “to people accepting their vision impairment and adjusting their lives around it.” The result? A lower quality of life, restricted job options, and even further economic distress.


 

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Jane Chen (MBA '08)]

Jane Chen's passion for helping others has taken her on an incredible journey from doing social work in China to founding Embrace, a company that sells premature infant incubators.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Karen Routt]

Caring for aging parents is a challenge many face, yet there is no clear path or pattern for how to manage this stage of life. Karen Routt shares her expertise at the nexus between technology and caring for the elderly.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Dr. Patricia Einarson]

With a high-tech background, an MBA, and an M.D., Dr. Patty Einarson has a unique perspective on the intersection of technology, business and medicine.  She leverages this knowledge by contributing to math/science education in the public schools, encouraging the kids of today to become future innovators.

Resource: Alumni

Mark Cafferty is passionate about empowering individuals to be all they can be. He channels funds to employment and youth service programs.

Resource: CSI Affiliates
[photo - Mulago Foundation]

The Mulago Foundation is a private foundation focused on the prospect of creating a better life for the world's poor. When it comes to making investments, one of the most important aspects of the Mulago approach is the ability of the organization to have a measurable impact. Mulago needed to develop an approach to the measurement of impact that was simple enough for an early-state, resource-constrained, organization to carry out. This mini-case study describes the five-step framework that the Foundation developed.

Resource: Academic Case

How a New York-based company is trying to make surgery in the developing world a lot easier.

Resource: News Article

New Stanford research says those with big health problems may be getting less for their money than they could — and raising prices for all.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Inspire]

Globally, pneumonia kills more children than any other illness. In developed countries, pneumonia and other acute respiratory conditions are treated via mechanical ventilators. In resource-constrained settings, however, ventilators are often not available because of their high cost. An approach has been used successfully, although not considered standard of care, is bubble continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). CPAPs are low-cost and effective, but require oxygen tanks, which are expensive to transport to rural regions. in 2011, a team of Stanford students set out to design a  machine that would create the pressurized air of bubble CPAP without the cost, burden, and safety concerns with using oxygen tanks. This case explores the factors that the Inspire team members evaluated in deciding whether or not to take their prototype into development. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Respira]

To Help Address the burden of childhood asthma in developing countries, Respira Design created an asthma spacer that was produced from a single sheet of paper. The device could ship and store flat and then be transformed into a usable spacer through a series of cuts and folds. However, as a medical device, it was necessary to test the extent to which it impacted the delivery of medication and how many uses each spacer could sustain. The team also needed to study the circumstances in which the device would perform successfully. This case examines how Respira address these issues.

Resource: Academic Case
Corner