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Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2010

THE SILENT LANGUAGE by Edward T. Hall

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2010

Kickstarter invites people with good ideas to post videos and other media to tell their own stories.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

The fine arts in America are on a perilous path. Attendance at opera, theater, jazz, symphony, and ballet performances has dropped precipitously in recent decades. Just as worrisome, the median age of people attending these events has increased dramatically. If the fine arts are to survive as a living, creative, and significant force in American life, arts institutions need to radically recreate themselves.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

The conventional view of human nature is that self-interest is our strongest instinct.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

How a Jewish charity is responding to one of the biggest scams in history.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
[photo - What Makes a Happy vs. Meaningful Life?]

Professor Frank Flynn looks at the difference between “happiness” and “meaning” in life –– and how these two concepts relate to being prosocial.

Resource: News Article
[photo - group membership]

Professor Frank Flynn describes how perceptions of “group membership” can influence whether others decide to help in emergency situations.   


Resource: News Article
[photo - Ulises1]

One of Mexico's leading businessmen advises a group of artists on their launch of one of the world's first art satellites.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Happy Money]

In this column I explore the idea that many of the ways we spend money are prosocial acts — and prosocial expenditures may, in fact, make us happier than personal expenditures. Authors Elizabeth Dunn and Michael Norton discuss evidence for this in their new book Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending. These behavioral scientists show that you can get more out of your money by following several principles — like spending money on others rather than yourself. Moreover, they demonstrate that these principles can be used not only by individuals, but also by companies seeking to create happier employees and more satisfying products.

Resource: News Article
[photo - global investment]

Institutional investors often favor deals close to home — even though it can cost them dearly.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Spring 2009

Many philanthropists refrain from online giving.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2009

Group attachment and commitment are what drive protesters to act.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2009

THE STRUCTURE OF SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTIONS by Thomas S. Kuhn  Review by Jessica Jackley Flannery

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2009

We don’t necessarily like people who do the right thing. 

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Winter 2009

ICONOCLAST: A Neuroscientist Reveals How to Think Differently by Gregory Berns  Review by Robert J. Sternberg

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

How nonprofits can create quality content online.

Resource: Blog Post

A youth summit discusses online platforms as a means of catalyzing social change.

Resource: Blog Post

“Starfish” organizations are gaining the upper hand in the nonprofit world.

Resource: Blog Post

Should social media communities be focused on the means or the ends?

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video

How do we get individuals to practice healthier habits and influence positive behavior change? The "Behavior Wizard" offers technology-based solutions in this audio lecture from the 2011 Stanford Graduate School of Business Healthcare Summit. B.J. Fogg, Director of the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford University, bring his insights from the tech world. In decades studying how computers and mobile apps can be used to bring about behavior change, Fogg found new applications for the health sector in promoting positive habits.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Challenges and Opportunities of Nationality]

Social enterprise can both ease the terrible consequences of the insularity inherent in nationalism, and enhance the positive opportunities for social change within established heritage and cultural traditions. In this panel discussion, sponsored by the Stanford Center for Social Innovation, experts consider topics ranging from multiculturalism within countries to cross-national and international cultural challenges and opportunities.

Resource: Audio

Technology has increased the flow of information and made our decision-making more transparent. In this panel discussion on empathy and ethics, Bill Drayton, Mary Gordon, Keith Hammonds, Kirk Hanson, and Jill Vialet consider how empathetic ethics has to begin with individuals and can only then move into the organizations we lead and the societies we serve.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Professor in Economics]

At what stage in life do innovators make their most significant contributions to social enterprise? In this audio lecture, economist and creativity researcher David Galenson debunks the myth that high achievement is the domain of youth and genius for an audience of social entrepreneurs over the age of 60. Applying lessons learned from lives of artists and leaders, he considers differences in style and time horizons of creative people, emphasizing that social innovation is more about slow burn than flash in the pan.

Resource: Audio

The question of what to eat to be healthy has spawned a rash of often contradictory advice by "experts." In this audio lecture, sponsored by the Stanford Ethics and Society Program, NYU professor and author Marion Nestle offers simple advice that cuts through the confusion. She highlights the difference between "nutrients" and "food," and suggests how to bring "nutrition" back into the food realm. Her discussion forays into how agriculture and business interact to produce the foodstuffs on our shelves.

Resource: Audio
[Video-‪John Roberts: Does Working from Home Work?‬]

 

An interview with Professor John Roberts about his study results on the efficacy of working from home.

Resource: Video
[Video-Cory Booker's 2012 Commencement Address]

Cory Booker, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey, challenges Stanford graduates to be courageous, never lose faith and always work together during Stanford's 121st Commencement. He extolls lessons from his own father and grandfather through stories of hardship, hope, and humor. Booker encourages graduates to find and join their own "conspiracy of love" -- people who will help lift them up in times of need, provide a community and challenge them to go beyond what they think is possible.

Resource: Video
[Video-The Effectiveness of Message Framing to Influence Behavior]

Most observers agree that human consumption is on a crash course with the environment. Although recycling programs have been implemented in many cities around the world, people often do not participate as often as they could. This research examines the effectiveness of messages that highlight the negative consequences of not recycling (loss frames) versus those that emphasize the positive consequences of recycling (gain frames) in influencing people's behavior.

Resource: Video
[Video-Using People's Irrationality To Do Good]

Identifying effective obesity treatment is both a clinical challenge and a public health priority. Can monetary incentives stimulate weight loss? Leslie John presents a study that examines different economic incentives for weight loss during a 16 week intervention.

Resource: Video
[Video-‪John Roberts: Does Working from Home Work?‬]

 

An interview with Professor John Roberts about his study results on the efficacy of working from home.

Resource: Video
[Video-Cory Booker's 2012 Commencement Address]

Cory Booker, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey, challenges Stanford graduates to be courageous, never lose faith and always work together during Stanford's 121st Commencement. He extolls lessons from his own father and grandfather through stories of hardship, hope, and humor. Booker encourages graduates to find and join their own "conspiracy of love" -- people who will help lift them up in times of need, provide a community and challenge them to go beyond what they think is possible.

Resource: Video
[Video-The Effectiveness of Message Framing to Influence Behavior]

Most observers agree that human consumption is on a crash course with the environment. Although recycling programs have been implemented in many cities around the world, people often do not participate as often as they could. This research examines the effectiveness of messages that highlight the negative consequences of not recycling (loss frames) versus those that emphasize the positive consequences of recycling (gain frames) in influencing people's behavior.

Resource: Video
[Video-Using People's Irrationality To Do Good]

Identifying effective obesity treatment is both a clinical challenge and a public health priority. Can monetary incentives stimulate weight loss? Leslie John presents a study that examines different economic incentives for weight loss during a 16 week intervention.

Resource: Video

How do we get individuals to practice healthier habits and influence positive behavior change? The "Behavior Wizard" offers technology-based solutions in this audio lecture from the 2011 Stanford Graduate School of Business Healthcare Summit. B.J. Fogg, Director of the Persuasive Technology Lab at Stanford University, bring his insights from the tech world. In decades studying how computers and mobile apps can be used to bring about behavior change, Fogg found new applications for the health sector in promoting positive habits.

Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases
No Results Found
[photo - Hau Lee]

Before opening its first store in India in 1996, McDonald’s spent six years building its supply chain. During that time, the company worked to successfully source as many ingredients as possible from India. However, French fries (“MacFries”) were a particularly tough product to source locally—and importing fries was undesirable for both cost and availability reasons. This case describes McDonald’s India and McCain India’s efforts to optimize the MacFry supply chain by increasing local supply in a fast-growing emerging market using agronomy, farmer relationship development and value chain innovation.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn Carroll]

The case discusses Nike’s sustainability and labor practices from 1998 to 2013, focusing on the successful steps Nike took up and down the supply chain and in its headquarters to make its products and processes more environmentally friendly, and the challenges and complexities it was still facing in its efforts to improve labor conditions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William Meehan III]

 

In 2007 a group of eight friends wanted to give. With so many charities out there, the friends wanted dot know which ones were doing the most good. This case covered the history of GiveWEll—a nonprofit dedicated to bringing greater and transparency to the world of philanthropy—and the evolution of its research methodology and philosophy for identifying outstanding charities.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

Since its founding n 1980, Ashoka: Innovators fo the Public had supported the work of over 3,000 of the world's most visionary social entrepreneurs. Even at the moment of Ashoka's dynamism propelled social entrepreneurship into the mainstream, founder Bill Drayton and his colleagues embraced an even more expansive view of social change: to suggest everyone in sociey is a "changemaker." This case traces the evolution of Ashoka's mission and vision for social change, and the programmatic and organizational changes required to achieve its vision.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William F. Meehan III]

Willow Creek Community Church in Illinois was one of the best attended and most influential churched in the United States. It was devoted to seekers and dedicated to helping the otherwise "unchurched" towards conversion and spiritual maturity. Executive pastor, Greg Hawkins, led the church in a strategic planning process to better understand "what was happening in the hearts and minds of their existing and potential customers." This case explores Willow's decision to bring this type of research to its church and apply analytical techniques to understand the needs of the congegration. 

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - R. James Ellis]

This fictional short case sets up a hiring scenario that can be analyzed through the lens of the best practices found in E416 Note on Hiring. A CEO wants to hire a VP of Strategy and Business Development. How will he know what he is looking for and when he has found the right person?

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Hau Lee]

Before opening its first store in India in 1996, McDonald’s spent six years building its supply chain. During that time, the company worked to successfully source as many ingredients as possible from India. However, French fries (“MacFries”) were a particularly tough product to source locally—and importing fries was undesirable for both cost and availability reasons. This case describes McDonald’s India and McCain India’s efforts to optimize the MacFry supply chain by increasing local supply in a fast-growing emerging market using agronomy, farmer relationship development and value chain innovation.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn Carroll]

The case discusses Nike’s sustainability and labor practices from 1998 to 2013, focusing on the successful steps Nike took up and down the supply chain and in its headquarters to make its products and processes more environmentally friendly, and the challenges and complexities it was still facing in its efforts to improve labor conditions.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - William Meehan III]

 

In 2007 a group of eight friends wanted to give. With so many charities out there, the friends wanted dot know which ones were doing the most good. This case covered the history of GiveWEll—a nonprofit dedicated to bringing greater and transparency to the world of philanthropy—and the evolution of its research methodology and philosophy for identifying outstanding charities.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Russell Lewis Siegelman]

This case series outlines the business formation of Votizen. Founder and CEO David Binetti’s original vision was to facilitate political action and organization. His efforts to start up led him through several manifestations of the original vision, each with its own challenges and quirks. Binetti used the dual lenses of Dave McClure’s so-called “Pirate Model” and Steve Blank’s “Customer Development Model” with which to navigate the waters. The case contains an unusual amount of detail as to the trials of starting up, as well as the usage and interpretation of the metrics prescribed by McClure and Blank.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Ask for help]

How can a certain kind of behavior actually contributes to inequalities? Specifically, do children’s social-class backgrounds affect when and how they seek help in the classroom, thereby teasing out children’s own role in educational stratification? We consider how teachers may use such information to correct these dynamics, and thus contribute to more equal access for all children at school.

Resource: Research Paper

A brief intervention aimed at buttressing college freshmen's sense of social belonging in school was tested in a randomized controlled trial, and its academic and health-related consequences over 3 years are reported. The intervention aimed to lessen psychological perceptions of threat on campus by framing social adversity as common and transient.

Resource: Research Paper

Crew members on an offshore oil rig toned down their bluster and macho behavior as an unexpected side effect of an initiative to cut down on-the-job injuries. The case study, coauthored by Debra Meyerson of the Stanford Graduate School of Business, could present a model for minimizing the effects of gender in other work settings.

Resource: Research Paper

What happens when restaurants are required to post calorie counts alongside food and beverage offerings? Average calories per transaction falls by 6 percent, researchers find.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Photo: Pencil Writing "Help!"]

Vanessa Bohns and Francis Flynn demonstrate that people in a position to provide help tend to underestimate the role that embarrassment plays in decisions about whether or not to ask for help. As a result, potential helpers overestimate the likelihood that people will ask for help and misjudge the most effective means of encouraging help-seeking behavior.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All
[photo - Roderick Kramer]

This course examines the lives of individuals who have contributed greatly to society, either through business, politics, arts and entertainment, or other pursuits. We take a close look, for example, at the "paths to prominence" of individuals such as Steve Jobs, Condi Rice, George Lucas, John F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All

Dave DeForest-Stalls wants to help kids stay out of gangs. He's providing mentorship and hip ways to keep youth on the straight and narrow.

Resource: CSI Affiliates

Ruth Bolan is giving voice to indigenous peoples of the Pacific Island. She funds documentaries that bring their culture and challenges to millions of viewers.

Resource: CSI Affiliates
[photo - Peter Hero]

Peter Hero has been helping philanthropists make a social impact for two decades. He's now inspiring students to get involved in social entrepreneurship.

Resource: Alumni
[photo - Ask for help]

How can a certain kind of behavior actually contributes to inequalities? Specifically, do children’s social-class backgrounds affect when and how they seek help in the classroom, thereby teasing out children’s own role in educational stratification? We consider how teachers may use such information to correct these dynamics, and thus contribute to more equal access for all children at school.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Recycle]

Recycling programs abound, but people are often lackadaisical about putting plastic, paper, glass, and metal into those bins. How can we get more people to recycle? An intervention recently conducted in Canada is pointing the way, and the message is all about ... well, the messaging.

Resource: News Article
[Video-The Effectiveness of Message Framing to Influence Behavior]

Most observers agree that human consumption is on a crash course with the environment. Although recycling programs have been implemented in many cities around the world, people often do not participate as often as they could. This research examines the effectiveness of messages that highlight the negative consequences of not recycling (loss frames) versus those that emphasize the positive consequences of recycling (gain frames) in influencing people's behavior.

Resource: Video
[Video-Using People's Irrationality To Do Good]

Identifying effective obesity treatment is both a clinical challenge and a public health priority. Can monetary incentives stimulate weight loss? Leslie John presents a study that examines different economic incentives for weight loss during a 16 week intervention.

Resource: Video
[photo - Symphony Orchestra ]
In a new book, economics Professor Robert Flanagan explains why symphony orchestras need multiple strategies to keep their finances from ballooning out of control.
Resource: News Article
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