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[photo - working from home]

New research says working from home boosts employee happiness and productivity.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Innovation]

Baba Shiv explains why creativity rests on diet, exercise, and a good night's sleep.

Resource: News Article

“Why do people create hierarchies when they say they don’t want them? One answer is that it makes thinking much easier,” says GSB Professor Larissa Tiedens. “We produce hierarchies to make our lives easier cognitively.”

Resource: News Article

What inspires people to act selflessly, help others, and make personal sacrifices? Unusual acts of kindness—like giving something away to someone you don’t even know and getting nothing in return—happens numerous times every day, in the form of blood donation, providing online reviews, and so on. In each case, someone provides a useful good, service, or bit of advice free of charge. In academic circles, this type of giving is referred as “generalized exchange.” Generalized exchange stands in contrast to “direct exchange,” in which payments are made or reciprocity is expected. Professor Frank Flynn and colleagues, Robb Willer and Sonya Zak, looked at these unusual acts of kindness and examined whether generalized exchange systems can create more solidarity than direct exchange systems.

Resource: News Article

Why mere potential can be more impressive than actual achievement.

Resource: News Article
[photo - working from home]

New research says working from home boosts employee happiness and productivity.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Innovation]

Baba Shiv explains why creativity rests on diet, exercise, and a good night's sleep.

Resource: News Article

“Why do people create hierarchies when they say they don’t want them? One answer is that it makes thinking much easier,” says GSB Professor Larissa Tiedens. “We produce hierarchies to make our lives easier cognitively.”

Resource: News Article

What inspires people to act selflessly, help others, and make personal sacrifices? Unusual acts of kindness—like giving something away to someone you don’t even know and getting nothing in return—happens numerous times every day, in the form of blood donation, providing online reviews, and so on. In each case, someone provides a useful good, service, or bit of advice free of charge. In academic circles, this type of giving is referred as “generalized exchange.” Generalized exchange stands in contrast to “direct exchange,” in which payments are made or reciprocity is expected. Professor Frank Flynn and colleagues, Robb Willer and Sonya Zak, looked at these unusual acts of kindness and examined whether generalized exchange systems can create more solidarity than direct exchange systems.

Resource: News Article

Why mere potential can be more impressive than actual achievement.

Resource: News Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

How a Jewish charity is responding to one of the biggest scams in history.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

“The question everyone asked was, ‘Why did those crazy people choose to stay?’"

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Fall 2009

The conventional view of human nature is that self-interest is our strongest instinct.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2009

Social Innovation now has a place in the White House.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article
Stanford Social Innovation Review: Summer 2009

Research supports violent media’s negative impact on civility.

Resource: Stanford Social Innovation Review Article

Just because we now have a Black President does not mean we should take the topic of diversity off of our agenda. 

Resource: Blog Post

Group-think extends to swarms of social activism. 

Resource: Blog Post

The author poses the question whether or not there really is a difference between religious organizations taking x percent of a donation for their church and a nonprofit taking money out for operating costs. 

Resource: Blog Post

“We’ve got to stop using the word ‘minorities’ to describe the communities we serve. It doesn’t have any value. It never has."- the author

Resource: Blog Post

Heed President Obama’s call to service and take action. 

Resource: Blog Post
Video/Audio : All | Audio | Video
[photo - Alex Lindsay]

As "chief architect" of PixelCorps, Alex Lindsay created a guild for the next generation of craftsmen: digital craftsmen. In this audio interview, Lindsay describes to Globeshakers host Tim Zak how PixelCorps is currently transferring skills in digital imaging and animation to regions in the developing world so that their workforces can capitalize on the coming media revolution.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Darrell Hammond]

Play affects children's quality of life. Yet, in many communities, schools, and families, this element has been pushed to the back burner. In an audio interview with Globeshakers host Tim Zak, Darrell Hammond envisions a great place to play within walking distance of every child in America. Since 1995, KaBOOM! has used its innovative community-build model to bring together business and community interests to construct more than 850 new playgrounds and skateparks, and renovate 1,300 others nationwide.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Andrew Zolli]

Futurist, design strategist, and author Andrew Zolli specializes in helping people and institutions see, understand, and act upon complex change. In this audio interview with Globeshakers host Tim Zak, Zolli discusses some of the grand challenges facing the globe, as well as emerging technologies that may address them.

Resource: Audio
[Video-‪John Roberts: Does Working from Home Work?‬]

 

An interview with Professor John Roberts about his study results on the efficacy of working from home.

Resource: Video
[Video-Cory Booker's 2012 Commencement Address]

Cory Booker, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey, challenges Stanford graduates to be courageous, never lose faith and always work together during Stanford's 121st Commencement. He extolls lessons from his own father and grandfather through stories of hardship, hope, and humor. Booker encourages graduates to find and join their own "conspiracy of love" -- people who will help lift them up in times of need, provide a community and challenge them to go beyond what they think is possible.

Resource: Video
[Video-The Effectiveness of Message Framing to Influence Behavior]

Most observers agree that human consumption is on a crash course with the environment. Although recycling programs have been implemented in many cities around the world, people often do not participate as often as they could. This research examines the effectiveness of messages that highlight the negative consequences of not recycling (loss frames) versus those that emphasize the positive consequences of recycling (gain frames) in influencing people's behavior.

Resource: Video
[Video-Using People's Irrationality To Do Good]

Identifying effective obesity treatment is both a clinical challenge and a public health priority. Can monetary incentives stimulate weight loss? Leslie John presents a study that examines different economic incentives for weight loss during a 16 week intervention.

Resource: Video
[photo - Fazle H. Abed]

Fazle Abed explains in this audio lecture how the Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC) is leading grassroots efforts to achieve the eight U.N. Millennium Development Goals in Bangladesh. He describes a multipronged strategy aimed at education, gender equality, health, environmental, economic, and political progress.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Rick Lowe]

Rick Lowe has given new meaning to the phrase "artist-in-residence." This Heinz Award winner and former Loeb fellow at the Harvard School of Design is the founder of Project Row Houses, an organization that merges art and architecture with social activism. In an audio interview with Globeshakers host Tim Zak, Lowe describes how this experiment in "social sculpture" is redefining the role of art and artists in society.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Marty Ashby]

As executive producer of MCG Jazz, Marty Ashby works with musicians who often devote their proceeds to a community arts and vocational training center in Pittsburg, Penn. In this audio interview, Ashby charts for Globeshakers host Tim Zak his career from jazz musician to director of this philanthropic jazz performance and recording venue.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Bill Strickland]

On Pittsburgh's gritty north side, just down the street from where he grew up, Bill Strickland has created a youth development and adult training center like no other. In this audio interview with Globeshakers host Tim Zak, Strickland talks about the environment he has melded over more than 40 years surrounded by stunning art, the sounds of jazz, beautiful orchids, and brilliant architecture, with programs that get kids into college and adults a job with a future.

Resource: Audio
[photo - Alex Lindsay]

As "chief architect" of PixelCorps, Alex Lindsay created a guild for the next generation of craftsmen: digital craftsmen. In this audio interview, Lindsay describes to Globeshakers host Tim Zak how PixelCorps is currently transferring skills in digital imaging and animation to regions in the developing world so that their workforces can capitalize on the coming media revolution.

Resource: Audio
Case Studies : All | Academic Cases
No Results Found

Bay Area Video Coalition, a nonprofit media services organization, has behaved like a high-tech business. Now it faces unique challenges and opportunities that are common to both nonprofit and for-profit businesses.

Resource: Academic Case

The executive director of a teen arts and entrepreneurship training program in Boston, Artists for Humanity, weighs issues of expansion, staff turnover, and fundraising. The organization’s challenges reflect those facing many small nonprofits, particularly those with an entrepreneurial arm.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Glenn Carroll]

Most brands of organic breakfast cereals were founded by hippies who wanted to make a difference in the world in the 70s and 80s. Since then, many have been taken over by large 'traditional' food companies with the likes of Kellogg and General Mills; Attune Foods is an exception. The case describes Attune's company strategy and the challenges it faces in competition against the food giants.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - Robert A. Burgelman]

The case covers the electric vehicle industry, starting with the history of the electric car and then moving on to the forces driving the twenty-first century automotive industry toward electrification. The case discusses the challenges to mass electric vehicle adoption, such as relatively higher prices, battery longevity concerns, competition, and the internal and external demands on the automotive industry.

Resource: Academic Case
[photo - David Larcker]

This case study examines prominent features of the governance system of Tesla Motors, as it has evolved from inception to IPO. Now that Tesla is public, how is its governance likely to change in the future?

Resource: Academic Case
Multimedia Case
[photo - James A. Phills]

Circus Oz, Australia’s premier, international circus, was exploring offering the new development officer position a higher-than-normal salary. The case and its companion videocase cover the organization’s dilemmas around this, and the situation’s resolution.

Resource: Academic Case
Multimedia Case

Innermotion dance company presents performances based on themes related to incest and childhood sexual abuse. This video explores how the founder must reexamine her focus and priorities when faced with the loss of a major grant.

Resource: Academic Case
Research Papers : All
[photo - Alexander Jordan]

The authors show that moral judgments can be more deeply embedded in judges' immediate social contexts--and are driven more by motivations to maintain self-image--than is typically appreciated in contemporary moral psychology research.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Hayagreeva Rao]

This article examines how the values espoused by social movements become entrenched in political culture and spawn many new kinds of institutions, which in turn shape organizations far from movements' original targets.

Resource: Research Paper
[photo - Glenn R. Carroll]

The authors examine the classic question of how religious diversity in a community affects church membership in a period of high growth and social change.

Resource: Research Paper
Courses : All
[photo - Roderick Kramer]

This course examines the lives of individuals who have contributed greatly to society, either through business, politics, arts and entertainment, or other pursuits. We take a close look, for example, at the "paths to prominence" of individuals such as Steve Jobs, Condi Rice, George Lucas, John F. Kennedy, and Martin Luther King.

Resource: MBA Course
Innovators : All

Dave DeForest-Stalls wants to help kids stay out of gangs. He's providing mentorship and hip ways to keep youth on the straight and narrow.

Resource: CSI Affiliates

Ruth Bolan is giving voice to indigenous peoples of the Pacific Island. She funds documentaries that bring their culture and challenges to millions of viewers.

Resource: CSI Affiliates
[photo - Peter Hero]

Peter Hero has been helping philanthropists make a social impact for two decades. He's now inspiring students to get involved in social entrepreneurship.

Resource: Alumni

Short psychological interventions can change preconceptions, altering how people interact with their world. Effects are potent, cumulative and long lasting. Recent Stanford research reveals the benefits of brief interventions in both aggressive teens and antagonistic spouses.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Time]

In this quarter’s column, we explore giving the gift of our time to others. It’s a fact that most Americans are feeling more time-constrained than ever. With waking hours largely consumed by work, precious minutes remain for the daily list of to-dos, including exercise, cleaning, and socializing with friends and family. For some, time has become an even more valuable resource than money.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Ethical Behavior]

New research shows how subtle changes in language can lead to more ethical behavior.

Resource: News Article
[photo - Gift Giving]

In this quarter’s column, we look at a common gift-giving practice: giving away a present you don’t really want. “Regifting” is generally regarded as a taboo, but is this practice really as offensive to the original giver as people think? And is there a way to shift cultural norms so as to promote this sort of gift recycling and reduce the trashing of perfectly good items?

Resource: News Article
[photo - working from home]

New research says working from home boosts employee happiness and productivity.

Resource: News Article
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